BCPARF 2022

Day 2: Concurrent Session 5

Regional Park Management

Session Moderator: Danika Medinski

Click below to read presentation abstracts. No recordings available.

Presenter: Lynn Wilson – Capital Regional District

Abstract:

The Capital Regional District (CRD) has provided a regional parks service since 1966. Since 2000, the CRD has actively expanded the regional parks system through use of the Land Acquisition Fund (LAF). Land acquisitions are guided by the CRD’s Regional Parks Land Acquisition Strategy (LAS) which identifies guiding principles and criteria for selecting desirable parcels of land to purchase. The LAS will be updated in 2023 to reflect the priorities identified in the interim Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan 2022-2032. The updated LAS will also reflect the CRD’s new approach to land acquisition that leverages borrowing capacity to purchase lands that would otherwise be unattainable on a pay-asyou-go savings model. This financing structure is anticipated to create a revenue stream that can be used to service up to $50 million of land purchases over 15 years, thereby leveraging a net increase in land values of more than $100 million. This session will provide an overview of the CRD Regional Parks’ land acquisition program as it evolves to meet the needs of a growing regional population, support First Nations reconciliation, and respond to global, national and local conservation targets by increasing the area of park land in the region.

Contributors:

  • Mike MacIntyre, Manager, Planning & Development, Regional Parks, Capital Regional District
  • Stephen Henderson, Senior Manager, Real Estate Services and Southern Gulf Islands, Capital Regional District

Acknowledgements:

The CRD conducts its business within the traditional territories of many First Nations, including but not limited to BOЌEĆEN (Pauquachin), MÁLEXEL (Malahat), Pacheedaht, Pune’laxutth’ (Penelekut), Sc’ianew (Beecher Bay), Songhees, STÁUTW_(Tsawout), T’Sou-ke, WJOLELP (Tsartlip), WSIKEM (Tseycum) and xwsepsem (Esquimalt), all of whom have a long standing relationship with the land and waters from time immemorial that continues to this day.

Presenter: Emma Taylor – Capital Regional District

Abstract:

The Capital Regional District’s (CRD’s) regional trail network was first established in the 1980s and now extends over 100km, offering recreation opportunities and serving as the anchor for the region’s active transportation network. The CRD’s Regional Parks division manages and operates the regional trail system that has grown to consume over 40% of the annual budget and rely heavily on grant funding and partnerships with municipalities and the province. Regional trail expansion and enhancement projects are underway to connect communities, accommodate increased use, improve safety and user comfort, and repair critical infrastructure. Efforts to improve planning, policy, asset management, levels of service and financial security are underway to ensure the success of regional trails for recreation and active transportation into the future.

Acknowledgements:

The CRD conducts its business within the traditional territories of many First Nations, including but not limited to BOЌEĆEN (Pauquachin), MÁLEXEL (Malahat), Pacheedaht, Pune’laxutth’ (Penelekut), Sc’ianew (Beecher Bay), Songhees, STÁUTW_(Tsawout), T’Sou-ke, WJOLELP (Tsartlip), WSIKEM (Tseycum) and xwsepsem (Esquimalt), all of whom have a long standing relationship with the land and waters from time immemorial that continues to this day.

Presenter: Todd Shannon – Capital Regional District

Abstract:

Mountain biking is a popular outdoor recreation activity enjoyed by a diversity of individuals for its physical, mental and social benefits.  Historically, individuals from the mountain bike community have built trails independently with varying support from land managers. In recent years sanctioned trail networks have emerged through partnerships and collaboration between local trail organizations and land managers, the majority of these on Crown, forestry or private land. How can land managers of parks and protected areas work with the mountain bike community to develop sanctioned trail networks, reduce un-official trail building, foster stewardship of the land and manage the risks associated with mountain biking? Capital Regional District Regional Parks has established formal agreements with two volunteer trail associations to support trail building and maintenance. These agreements enable a range of mountain bike experiences that engages the biking community in the consideration of other user activities and an understanding of the value in protecting, restoring and enhancing these natural areas.

Contributors:

  • Rachel Ince, Capital Regional District

Acknowledgements:

The CRD conducts its business within the traditional territories of many First Nations, including but not limited to BOЌEĆEN (Pauquachin), MÁLEXEL (Malahat), Pacheedaht, Pune’laxutth’ (Penelekut), Sc’ianew (Beecher Bay), Songhees, STÁUTW_(Tsawout), T’Sou-ke, WJOLELP (Tsartlip), WSIKEM (Tseycum) and xwsepsem (Esquimalt), all of whom have a long standing relationship with the land and waters from time immemorial that continues to this day.

Presenter: Sarah Forbes – Capital Regional District

Abstract:

Since 1966, the Capital Regional District (CRD) has been delivering the regional park service, proactively managing its natural and engineered assets. To meet service delivery requirements in a region experiencing substantial population growth, demographic and climate change, asset management practices have been implemented to confirm resources are available to meet the current and future investment needs of the regional park system. Financial sustainability, through the implementation of a 10-year capital plan and 20-year asset renewal program, forms the foundation of the Regional Park Sustainable Service Delivery plan. Robust asset management practices, including developing asset management plans that include future level of service, risk, and demand considerations for major regional park assets, and long-term financial reporting will enable the regional park service to continue to achieve its mandate of protecting and restoring the region’s biodiversity while offering compatible outdoor recreation opportunities.

Acknowledgements:

The CRD conducts its business within the traditional territories of many First Nations, including but not limited to BOЌEĆEN (Pauquachin), MÁLEXEL (Malahat), Pacheedaht, Pune’laxutth’ (Penelekut), Sc’ianew (Beecher Bay), Songhees, STÁUTW_(Tsawout), T’Sou-ke, WJOLELP (Tsartlip), WSIKEM (Tseycum) and xwsepsem (Esquimalt), all of whom have a long standing relationship with the land and waters from time immemorial that continues to this day.

More Concurrent Sessions