Characterization of Light Pollution in Quebec’s National Parks and the Potential Candidacy of Parks as International Dark Sky Parks

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

This session presents the efforts made by the Quebec national parks network to characterize light pollution in several of its parks and to accompany them in the process of obtaining international certification as a dark sky protection area. With its expertise, the International Dark Sky Reserve of Mont-Mégantic (RICEMM), through the Mont-Mégantic National Park, is piloting these steps within the network.
The first part of the session will present a summary of the methodological steps for data collection, consisting of, among others: 1) continuous monitoring of light pollution at zenith with the installation of fixed instruments (TESS-W Photometer); 2) a photometric analysis of the quality of the night sky at high resolution by a mobile instrument (Sky Quality Camera); 3) a complete inventory of all outdoor luminaires in the park and an associated database; 4) interviews with managers to identify specific lighting needs. The analysis of these data takes the form of a large-scale mapping of the location of luminaires; an analysis of the impact of each luminaire on light pollution, according to criteria established in the scientific literature (i.e. need, orientation, color, intensity and period); and an identification of the most sensitive areas in terms of nocturnal ecosystems.

The second part of the presentation will deal with the support provided by the Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve team to national park managers to improve the protection of their nocturnal environment. We will present concrete solutions to reduce the impact of poor lighting on ecosystems and access to the starry sky, without forgetting the positive effects of these actions on the improvement of the experience of visitors in accommodation. Several tools already exist or are being produced to support managers in refurbishing their lighting, such as the “Practical Lighting Guide for the Sépaq Network”, which provides concrete examples according to the needs of each park sector (e.g. campgrounds, toilet blocks, reception pavilions, etc.).

In order to perpetuate these conservation efforts, the team also assists Quebec national parks wishing to obtain International Dark Sky Park certification, issued by the International Dark Sky Association. Finally, the example of Mont-Tremblant National Park will be briefly discussed to present the benefits of such certification with respect to the conservation of the national park territory itself, the impact of public awareness activities and the enhanced experience for visitors.

ABSTRACT

Cette session présente les efforts mis en place par le réseau des parcs nationaux du Québec pour caractériser la pollution lumineuse dans plusieurs de ses parcs et pour accompagner ceux-ci dans le processus d’obtention d’une certification internationale de territoire de protection du ciel étoilé. Forte de son expertise, la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic (RICEMM), par le biais du parc national du Mont-Mégantic, pilote ces démarches à l’intérieur du réseau.
Le premier volet de la session présentera un résumé des étapes méthodologiques pour la collecte de données, consistant entre autres en : 1) un suivi en continu de la pollution lumineuse au zénith avec l’installation d’instruments fixes (TESS-W Photometer); 2) une analyse photométrique de la qualité du ciel nocturne à haute résolution par un instrument mobile (Sky Quality Camera); 3) un inventaire complet de tous les luminaires extérieurs du parc et une base de données associée; 4) des entrevues avec les gestionnaires pour l’identification des besoins spécifiques en éclairage. L’analyse de ces données prend la forme d’une cartographie à grande échelle de la localisation des luminaires; d’une analyse de l’impact de chaque d’entre eux sur la pollution lumineuse, selon les critères établis dans la littérature scientifique (i.e. le besoin, l’orientation, la couleur, l’intensité et la période); et d’une identification des zones plus sensibles au niveau des écosystèmes nocturnes.

Le deuxième volet de la présentation traitera de l’accompagnement prodigué par l’équipe de la Réserve international du ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic aux gestionnaires des parcs nationaux pour améliorer la protection de leur environnement nocturne. Nous présenterons des solutions concrètes pour diminuer l’impact des mauvais éclairages sur les écosystèmes et l’accès au ciel étoilé, sans oublier les retombées positives de ces actions sur l’amélioration de l’expérience des visiteurs en hébergement. Plusieurs outils existent déjà ou sont en cours de production pour appuyer les gestionnaires dans la réfection de leurs éclairages, pensons ici au «Guide pratique d’éclairage du réseau de la Sépaq» qui collige des exemples concrets selon les besoins de chaque secteur des parcs (e.g. campings, blocs sanitaires, pavillon d’accueil, etc.).

Afin de pérenniser ces efforts de conservation, l’équipe accompagne également les parcs nationaux du Québec désirant obtenir une certification de Parc international de ciel étoilé, délivrée par l’International Dark Sky Association. Finalement, l’exemple du parc national du Mont-Tremblant sera brièvement abordé pour présenter les avantages d’une telle certification à l’égard de la conservation même du territoire du parc national, de l’impact des activités de sensibilisation au public et de l’expérience bonifiée pour les visiteurs.

Teaching Visitors How to Be ‘Bison Wise’ and ‘Bear Aware’: Best Practices and Lessons in Social Science for Behaviour Change

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

One of the most pressing and challenging issues of our modern era is educating people about the alarming effects of environmental issues such as climate change and helping them to understand the importance of taking action. The question remains as to how environmental educators can help ensure the public understands the science behind environmental issues, realize their role in addressing these issues, and feel empowered to do so (Ballantyne & Packer, 2005; 2011; Bueddefeld & Van Winkle, 2017; 2018; Hughes, 2013; Hughes, Packer, & Ballantyne, 2011). Biosphere reserves play an important role in educating people about environmental issues, encouraging an attachment to place, and facilitating meaningful pro-environmental behaviour change (UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada, 2019). Specifically, the UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada (2019) identifies that biospheres “are proof that a sustainable way of living is not only possible but already happening; provide local and scalable solutions to balance long-term conservation and sustainable use of natural resources; and inspire Canadians and all global citizens to replicate the practices modelled in biosphere reserves”. With these objectives in mind, Biosphere reserves need to be places for the public to learn tangible lessons in how to live harmoniously with nature and wildlife. Specifically, targeted programming, that is intended to help visitors learn how to safely interact with wildlife, is needed. This session will present the findings from a study conducted with a team of social scientists from the University of Alberta and the interpretive team from Elk Island National Park. The purpose of the research was to determine the efficacy of a dialogic-based interpretation approach to teach visitors how to become ‘Bison Wise’ and ‘Bear Aware’. Using principles from Transformative Learning Theory, Community-Based Social Marketing, and dialogic-narrative structures the research team worked with Parks Canada staff to determine key messages and related action outcomes (McKenzie-Mohr, 2000; Mezirow, 2012; Williams, Darville, & McBroom, 2018). With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the cancellation of all in person interpretation during the summer of 2020, the research team and Parks Canada Interpreters pivoted to create a short interpretive video using the dialogic-based narrative approach. With limited ability to contact visitors and low response rates the research team created an innovative mixed-methods approach to evaluate the success of the interpretive video. Results indicated that this approach was very effective in helping visitors to learn key messages and successfully demonstrate the ‘thumb rule’ and identify attractants. This presentation will focus on sharing the video created for this project and the storyboarding process used to incorporate key social science approaches to support visitor learning and behaviour change.

ABSTRACT

L’un des problèmes les plus urgents et les plus difficiles de notre époque moderne est d’éduquer les gens sur les effets alarmants des problèmes environnementaux tels que le changement climatique et de les aider à comprendre l’importance d’agir. La question demeure de savoir comment les éducateurs en environnement peuvent contribuer à faire en sorte que le public comprenne la science qui sous-tend les problèmes environnementaux, qu’il prenne conscience de son rôle dans la résolution de ces problèmes et qu’il se sente habilité à le faire (Ballantyne & Packer, 2005 ; 2011 ; Bueddefeld & Van Winkle, 2017 ; 2018 ; Hughes, 2013 ; Hughes, Packer, & Ballantyne, 2011). Les réserves de biosphère jouent un rôle important pour éduquer les gens sur les questions environnementales, encourager l’attachement à un lieu et faciliter un changement de comportement pro-environnemental significatif (UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada, 2019). Plus précisément, les Réserves de biosphère de l’UNESCO au Canada (2019) identifient que les biosphères ” sont la preuve qu’un mode de vie durable est non seulement possible, mais qu’il existe déjà ; elles fournissent des solutions locales et évolutives pour équilibrer la conservation à long terme et l’utilisation durable des ressources naturelles ; et elles inspirent les Canadiens et tous les citoyens du monde à reproduire les pratiques modelées dans les réserves de biosphère ”. Avec ces objectifs en tête, les réserves de biosphère doivent être des endroits où le public peut apprendre des leçons tangibles sur la façon de vivre harmonieusement avec la nature et la faune. Plus précisément, il est nécessaire de mettre en place des programmes ciblés, destinés à aider les visiteurs à apprendre comment interagir en toute sécurité avec la faune. Cette séance présentera les résultats d’une étude menée par une équipe de spécialistes en sciences sociales de l’Université de l’Alberta et l’équipe d’interprétation du parc national Elk Island. L’objectif de la recherche était de déterminer l’efficacité d’une approche d’interprétation basée sur le dialogue pour enseigner aux visiteurs comment devenir “Bison Wise” et “Bear Aware”. En utilisant les principes de la théorie de l’apprentissage transformateur, du marketing social communautaire et des structures narratives dialogiques, l’équipe de recherche a travaillé avec le personnel de Parcs Canada pour déterminer les messages clés et les résultats d’action connexes (McKenzie-Mohr, 2000 ; Mezirow, 2012 ; Williams, Darville et McBroom, 2018). Avec le début de la pandémie de COVID-19 et l’annulation de toute interprétation en personne pendant l’été 2020, l’équipe de recherche et les interprètes de Parcs Canada ont pivoté pour créer une courte vidéo d’interprétation en utilisant l’approche narrative basée sur le dialogue. Avec une capacité limitée de contacter les visiteurs et de faibles taux de réponse, l’équipe de recherche a créé une approche innovante de méthodes mixtes pour évaluer le succès de la vidéo d’interprétation. Les résultats indiquent que cette approche a été très efficace pour aider les visiteurs à apprendre les messages clés et à démontrer avec succès la ” règle du pouce ” et à identifier les attraits. Cette présentation se concentrera sur le partage de la vidéo créée pour ce projet et sur le processus de storyboarding utilisé pour incorporer les approches clés des sciences sociales afin de soutenir l’apprentissage et le changement de comportement des visiteurs.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Democratization of Spatial Planning for Conservation Under Climate Change

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

The impacts of climate change have already been felt in British Columbia, are expected to intensify in future, and pose an unprecedented risk to the natural environment and socio-economic systems that depend on it. We describe a collaboration of the British Columbia Parks Foundation (BCPF), Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), Nature Trust British Columbia (NTBC), and Universities of BC and Northern BC to deliver a web-based tool that can facilitate climate-informed systematic conservation planning, and which will become accessible to all NGO, government, and private institutions and individuals in BC. CAP-BC (Climate Adaptive Planning BC) is a web-based, graphical user interface that employs well-accepted planning principles, advanced species and climate velocity mapping, and land cover and human footprint data, to find near-optimal solutions to a wide range of problems in conservation prioritization. In this presentation, we show how BCPF’s desire to identify climate refuges and corridors, CPAWS’ desire to conserve biodiverse regions and rare, large and wide-ranging species, and NTBC’s desire to acquire land with of high conservation value can be advanced under climate-related uncertainty. We use then these results as a means to invite input on the additional feature layers and capabilities desired by other potential users. CAP-BC is the first spatial optimization tool capable of prioritizing land for conservation under climate change across BC, based on its predicted resilience to climate change, value as a climate refuge, and role in facilitating species movement and dispersal at the landscape-scales.

ABSTRACT

Les impacts du changement climatique ont déjà été ressentis en Colombie-Britannique, devraient s’intensifier à l’avenir et poser un risque sans précédent pour l’environnement naturel et les systèmes socio-économiques qui en dépendent. Nous décrivons une collaboration entre la British Columbia Parks Foundation (BCPF), la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada (SNAP), le Nature Trust British Columbia (NTBC) et les universités de la Colombie-Britannique et du Nord de la Colombie-Britannique pour fournir un outil en ligne qui peut faciliter la planification systématique de la conservation en fonction du climat, et qui sera accessible à toutes les ONG, au gouvernement, aux institutions privées et aux particuliers en Colombie-Britannique. CAP-BC (Climate Adaptive Planning BC) est une interface utilisateur graphique basée sur le Web qui utilise des principes de planification bien acceptés, une cartographie avancée des espèces et de la vélocité du climat, ainsi que des données sur la couverture du sol et l’empreinte humaine, pour trouver des solutions quasi-optimales à un large éventail de problèmes de priorisation de la conservation. Dans cette présentation, nous montrons comment le désir de la BCPF d’identifier des refuges et des corridors climatiques, le désir de la SNAP de conserver des régions biodiverses et des espèces rares, de grande taille et à large répartition, et le désir de la NTBC d’acquérir des terres à haute valeur de conservation peuvent être avancés dans un contexte d’incertitude liée au climat. Nous utilisons ensuite ces résultats comme un moyen de solliciter des commentaires sur les couches de caractéristiques et les capacités supplémentaires souhaitées par d’autres utilisateurs potentiels. CAP-BC est le premier outil d’optimisation spatiale capable de prioriser les terres à conserver dans le contexte du changement climatique en Colombie-Britannique, en fonction de leur résilience prévue au changement climatique, de leur valeur en tant que refuge climatique et de leur rôle dans la facilitation du mouvement et de la dispersion des espèces à l’échelle du paysage.

Near-Urban Nature Network in Southern Ontario

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

Near-urban nature is comprised of the forests, river valleys, wetlands, savannahs, and other ecological features that surround and intersect human communities. This nature is critical to the health and well-being of all life in the area and is one of our greatest resources for adapting to climate change. While we often look to protect wilderness areas farther afield, southern Ontario is one of the most biodiverse regions in Canada—providing direct and irreplaceable ecosystem services to the country’s largest concentration of communities and people. This proximity puts near-urban nature at high risk of being degraded and lost, making increased conservation of ecological cores and corridors critical. Protected areas and parks in these contexts require strategic and collaborative approaches to ensure connectivity and long-term ecological integrity. This presentation will focus on the Southern Ontario Nature Coalition’s Near-Urban Nature Network Strategy that identifies evidence-based priorities and opportunities to address threats and create a more resilient region.

Protecting and connecting near-urban nature within Ontario’s Greater Golden Horseshoe is a challenge given multiple jurisdictions, competing visions for the use of lands, and highly fragmented ownership. Continued urban growth when met with the climate crisis will make more Canadians vulnerable to flooding, heat waves, droughts, and other stresses that affect everything from our infrastructure to our food production systems and local economies. Meeting this challenge begins with awareness of nature’s benefits. Indigenous histories and knowledge systems in preserving nature can inform strategies and advance management of the lands, water, and wildlife in the region.

Key insights from the strategy will be shared including the underlying research on regional ecology and ecosystem services in addition to priorities identified through engagement and input from Indigenous communities and a wide array of stakeholders in the region including municipalities, conservation authorities, agricultural groups, academics, environmental groups and public health professionals.

This presentation will cover the following key takeaways within Ontario’s Greater Golden Horseshoe context:

Major threats to biodiversity in southern Ontario.

Contributions of nature to human health, wellbeing, and climate resilience.

Existing protected areas and important corridors.

Interesting solutions to protect near urban nature at an increased rate.

Respect Indigenous communities as land right’s holders and amplify Indigenous knowledge systems and leadership.

ABSTRACT

La nature périurbaine est constituée des forêts, des vallées fluviales, des zones humides, des savanes et d’autres caractéristiques écologiques qui entourent et croisent les communautés humaines. Cette nature est essentielle à la santé et au bien-être de toute vie dans la région et constitue l’une de nos plus grandes ressources pour nous adapter au changement climatique. Alors que nous cherchons souvent à protéger des zones sauvages plus éloignées, le sud de l’Ontario est l’une des régions les plus riches en biodiversité du Canada, fournissant des services écosystémiques directs et irremplaçables à la plus grande concentration de communautés et de personnes du pays. Cette proximité fait que la nature proche des villes risque fortement de se dégrader et de disparaître, ce qui rend essentielle la conservation accrue des noyaux et des corridors écologiques. Les zones protégées et les parcs dans ces contextes nécessitent des approches stratégiques et collaboratives pour assurer la connectivité et l’intégrité écologique à long terme. Cette présentation se concentrera sur la stratégie de réseau de nature quasi urbaine de la Coalition pour la nature du Sud de l’Ontario qui identifie les priorités et les opportunités fondées sur des preuves pour faire face aux menaces et créer une région plus résiliente.

Protéger et connecter la nature proche des villes dans la région du Grand Golden Horseshoe de l’Ontario est un défi étant donné les multiples juridictions, les visions concurrentes pour l’utilisation des terres et la propriété très fragmentée. La croissance urbaine continue, conjuguée à la crise climatique, rendra davantage de Canadiens vulnérables aux inondations, aux vagues de chaleur, aux sécheresses et à d’autres stress qui affectent tout, de nos infrastructures à nos systèmes de production alimentaire et aux économies locales. Pour relever ce défi, il faut d’abord prendre conscience des bienfaits de la nature. Les histoires et les systèmes de connaissances indigènes en matière de préservation de la nature peuvent éclairer les stratégies et faire progresser la gestion des terres, de l’eau et de la faune de la région.

Les principaux enseignements de la stratégie seront partagés, y compris la recherche sous-jacente sur l’écologie régionale et les services écosystémiques, en plus des priorités identifiées grâce à l’engagement et à la contribution des communautés autochtones et d’un large éventail d’intervenants dans la région, y compris les municipalités, les offices de protection de la nature, les groupes agricoles, les universitaires, les groupes environnementaux et les professionnels de la santé publique.

Cette présentation portera sur les principaux points à retenir suivants dans le contexte de la région élargie du Golden Horseshoe de l’Ontario :

Les principales menaces qui pèsent sur la biodiversité dans le sud de l’Ontario.

Les contributions de la nature à la santé et au bien-être des humains, ainsi qu’à la résilience climatique.

Les zones protégées existantes et les corridors importants.

Des solutions intéressantes pour protéger la nature proche de l’urbain à un rythme accru.

Respecter les communautés autochtones en tant que détentrices de droits fonciers et amplifier les systèmes de connaissances et le leadership autochtones.

Il y a des solutions intéressantes pour protéger la nature en milieu urbain.

Monitoring Ecosystems in the Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve by Remote Sensing

The above was presented at the the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

Remote sensing can make an important contribution to monitoring changes in protected areas. Although field data remains the most common method of collecting biodiversity information, remote sensing data has enormous potential for obtaining data over a large area, in a short period of time, and when the land is difficult to access. This presentation aims to demonstrate the potential of remote sensing from aerial and satellite imagery in protected areas for baseline condition determination, habitat mapping, and assessment of changing environmental conditions. In the Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve, the availability of a series of high-resolution aerial photos obtained at regular intervals since 1967 provides continuity that makes it possible to monitor the evolution of forest habitats subject to natural disturbances (e.g. windfall, cormorants, spruce budworm), the dynamics of the coastlines and the evolution of vegetation in the maritime tundra, in ecosystems that are sensitive to local climatic and biophysical conditions. From Lidar surveys, it is possible to generate precise and detailed information on landscape structure. Satellite images, meanwhile, are an important source of data for the rapid detection of large-scale changes. We will also present the issues and challenges related to the acquisition of such data that can limit the efficient use of this resource. Collaborations that promote access to remote sensing expertise and targeted products will be beneficial in realizing the full potential of remote sensing in protected areas.

ABSTRACT

La télédétection permet de contribuer de manière importante à  la surveillance des changements qui se produisent dans les aires protégées. Bien que les données terrains demeurent la méthode la plus commune de recueillir l’information sur la biodiversité, les données de télédétection offrent un potentiel énorme permettant l’obtention de données sur une grande superficie, en une courte période de temps, et lorsque le territoire y est difficile d’accès. Cette présentation vise à  démontrer le potentiel de la télédétection par imagerie aérienne et satellitaire dans les aires protégées à  des fins d’établissement des conditions de référence, de cartographie des habitats, et d’évaluation des changements de condition des milieux. Dans la réserve de parc national de l’Archipel-de-Mingan, la disponibilité d’une série de photos aériennes à  haute résolution obtenue à  intervalles réguliers depuis 1967 offre une continuité qui permet de suivre l’évolution des habitats forestiers soumis aux perturbations naturelles (ex : chablis, cormorans, tordeuse des bourgeons de l’épinette), la dynamique des cà´tes et l’évolution de la végétation dans la toundra maritime, dans des écosystèmes sensibles aux conditions climatiques et biophysiques locales. à€ partir des relevés Lidar, il est possible de générer de l’information précise et détaillée sur la structure du paysage. Les images satellitaires, quant à  elles, constituent une source de données importante permettant la détection rapide de changements à  grande échelle. Nous présenterons également les enjeux et défis liés à  l’acquisition de telles données qui peuvent limiter l’utilisation efficace de cette ressource. Des collaborations favorisant l’accès à  une expertise en télédétection et à  l’obtention de produits ciblés seront bénéfiques pour réaliser le plein potentiel de la télédétection dans les aires protégées.

Coastal Restoration of the Beach at Cap-Des-Rosiers, Forillon National Park

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Daniel Sigouin avec Parc national Forillon.

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Daniel Sigouin with Forillon National Park.

 

ABSTRACT

(English below)

Figurant parmi les projets d’adaptation les plus impressionnants jamais réalisés par Parcs Canada, le projet de restauration de la plage de Cap-des-Rosiers au parc national Forillon est une réponse au phénomène d’érosion côtière et aux événements de tempàutes extràumes récurrents issus des changements climatiques. Dans le but de restaurer la dynamique naturelle de l’écosystème côtier et préserver les sites de fraie des poissons-proies, Parcs Canada a procédé au retrait d’un enrochement de protection, au démantèlement d’un tronàon routier et à la restauration d’une plage sur près de 1,7 km. L’implantation historique d’infrastructures dans une zone à risque et l’empiètement de ces infrastructures sur une zone naturelle très dynamique ont accentué la perte d’habitat côtier dans le secteur, la vulnérabilité des sites de fraie du capelan, en plus de menacer l’intégrité écologique d’un milieu humide, de contribuer à la détérioration d’un site de sépulture et de constituer un enjeu majeur de gestion des infrastructures. Les travaux ont nécessité le retrait d’un enrochement, la restauration d’une plage, la relocalisation d’un tronàon routier et d’un monument commémoratif. Des suivis permettent de documenter l’utilisation de l’habitat par le capelan et évaluer la réaction du milieu côtier. Les résultats observés jusqu’à maintenant dépassent les attentes pour ce projet d’une envergure inégalée. Depuis 2016, les sites de fraie du capelan sont en croissance et le profil de la plage se stabilise déjà . Aujourd’hui plus résiliente aux événements de tempàutes extràumes, la plage de Cap-des-Rosiers est à nouveau un habitat riche en matière de biodiversité et témoigne d’un pan important de l’histoire de la région. La session débuterait par une présentation du projet et des raisons ayant conduit à sa réalisation, mais également des leàons apprises lors de la mise en Å“uvre d’un projet d’une telle envergure. Au cours de la session, nous comptons discuter avec les participants du rôle de leader que les aires protégées peuvent avoir dans la réalisation de projet de restauration durable en lien avec les changements climatiques ainsi que des possibilités d’exportation des connaissances et expériences acquises aux communautés canadiennes. Nous comptons également aborder le sujet des suivis à court et long terme des projets de restaurations et des enjeux auxquels nous faisons face à cet égard.

ABSTRACT

One of the most impressive adaptation projects ever carried out by Parks Canada, the Cap-des-Rosiers beach restoration project at Forillon National Park is a response to the phenomenon of coastal erosion and recurring extreme storm events resulting from climate change. In order to restore the natural dynamics of the coastal ecosystem and preserve prey fish spawning sites, Parks Canada has removed protective riprap, dismantled a stretch of road and restored a beach over nearly 1.7 km. The historical location of infrastructures in a high-risk zone and the encroachment of these infrastructures on a very dynamic natural area have accentuated the loss of coastal habitat in the sector, the vulnerability of capelin spawning sites, in addition to threatening the ecological integrity of a wetland, contributing to the deterioration of a burial site and constituting a major infrastructure management issue. The work required the removal of riprap, the restoration of a beach, the relocation of a stretch of road and a commemorative monument. Monitoring is used to document the use of the habitat by capelin and to evaluate the reaction of the coastal environment. The results observed to date have exceeded expectations for this project of unprecedented scope. Since 2016, capelin spawning sites are growing and the beach profile is already stabilizing. Now more resilient to extreme storm events, Cap-des-Rosiers beach is once again a habitat rich in biodiversity and bears witness to an important part of the region’s history. The session would begin with a presentation of the project and the reasons that led to its realization, but also of the lessons learned during the implementation of such a large-scale project. During the session, we intend to discuss with participants the leadership role that protected areas can play in the implementation of sustainable restoration projects related to climate change and the opportunities to export the knowledge and experience gained to Canadian communities. We will also discuss the short and long term monitoring of restoration projects and the issues we face in this regard.

Scanning the Horizon – Emerging Issues for Parks and Protected Areas in Canada

https://vimeo.com/533830224

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Dr. Sabine Dietz, Office of the Chief Ecosystem Scientist with Parks Canada.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, soumis par le Dr. Sabine Dietz, Bureau du scientifique en chef des écosystèmes de Parcs Canada.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Parks Canada is collaborating with the Canadian Parks Collective for Innovation and Leadership (CPCIL) in conducting a Horizon Scan. Using the Horizon Scan methodology (e.g., see Sutherland 2020 to learn more), the scan is identifying emerging issues with the potential to affect ecosystems and ecosystem services in protected areas across Canada. The Scan will be completed by the end of February. The session will include a 15-min video about the completed process, as well as an interactive mini horizon scan.

ABSTRACT

Parcs Canada collabore avec le Collectif canadien pour l’innovation et le leadership dans les parcs (CPCIL) pour mener une analyse d’horizon. En utilisant la méthodologie de l’analyse d’horizon (par exemple, voir Sutherland 2020 pour en savoir plus), l’analyse identifie les nouveaux problèmes susceptibles d’affecter les écosystèmes et les services écosystémiques dans les zones protégées du Canada. L’analyse sera terminée d’ici la fin du mois de février. La session comprendra une vidéo de 15 minutes sur le processus achevé, ainsi qu’un mini-balayage interactif de l’horizon.

 

Managing Human Use In Canada’s National Parks – Defining a Way Forward

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.


The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Dr. Sarah Elmeligi with Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – Southern Alberta Chapter.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Dr. Sarah Elmeligi avec la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada – section du sud de l’Alberta.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

As visitation to some of Canada’s most popular National Parks increases, the impacts of “over-tourism” are becoming more acute and intense. Various ecological impacts of high visitation include the spread of invasive species, increased erosion and alteration of water flow patterns, increased risk of human-wildlife conflict, and displacement of sensitive species from critical habitats. The social impact of over-tourism includes increased crowding, visitor expectations not being met, and other impacts to the overall visitor experience, and potential impacts to the visitor experience. Throughout the years, Parks Canada has implemented various management actions to address visitor use at popular sites, such as shuttle buses, backcountry trail reservation systems, and encouraging visitation in shoulder seasons. Yet, these efforts have not been placed into a larger landscape strategic plan. The United States and Australia have also developed programs to strategically manage visitor use. Reviewing these approaches, we identified some commonalities. A successful visitor use management framework requires robust human use data and social science to understand levels of visitation, where people go, and what forms of recreation they participate in. Social science can also generate an understanding of visitor expectations and motivations to visit a park, which can shape management programs. Well supported visitor use management strategies engage with stakeholders throughout the process. All frameworks acknowledge that data gaps exist in our understanding of park ecological, social, and cultural values; these data gaps may be addressed as part of a framework that starts by creating visitor use objectives and goals. A robust visitor use management framework also requires monitoring programs within the context of adaptive management. This last component helps fill data gaps, facilitates experimenting with management options, and allows flexibility to continually refine management strategies to have the greatest positive effect on the park experience and its ecological attributes. Implementing a visitor use management strategy for any park is a massive effort requiring successful collaboration with external stakeholders, park managers, and the Canadian public. Finding solutions to these complex problems inherently involves the need to try new things, develop new and meaningful relationships, and reassess objectives regarding the visitor experience.

CPAWS Southern Alberta has proposed a step-by-step process that engages with stakeholders and results in a visitor use management strategy for landscape units in the Rocky Mountain National Parks:

1. Identify the Landscape Management Unit objectives and evaluation subjects relevant to visitor impacts on natural values

2. Prioritize natural assets and threats

3. Select indicators and establish thresholds

4. Establish management strategies

5. Implement, monitor, evaluate, and adjust

Putting existing management efforts into the context of an overarching strategy across a larger landscape can help increase management effectiveness in addressing multiple ecological, social, and cultural objectives. CPAWS will provide a brief overview of our proposed process and engage protected area managers in a discussion around how best to work collaboratively with stakeholders to address this complex issue.

ABSTRACT

Avec l’augmentation de la fréquentation de certains des parcs nationaux les plus populaires du Canada, les conséquences du “sur-tourisme” se font sentir de manière plus aiguë et plus intense. Parmi les divers impacts écologiques d’une forte fréquentation, on peut citer la propagation d’espèces envahissantes, l’augmentation de l’érosion et la modification des schémas d’écoulement des eaux, le risque accru de conflit entre l’homme et la faune sauvage et le déplacement d’espèces sensibles des habitats essentiels. L’impact social du sur-tourisme comprend l’augmentation de l’affluence, la non-satisfaction des attentes des visiteurs et d’autres impacts sur l’expérience globale du visiteur, ainsi que des impacts potentiels sur l’expérience du visiteur. Au fil des ans, Parcs Canada a mis en œuvre diverses mesures de gestion pour répondre à l’utilisation des visiteurs sur les sites populaires, comme les navettes, les systèmes de réservation de sentiers dans l’arrière-pays et l’encouragement de la fréquentation pendant les saisons intermédiaires. Cependant, ces efforts n’ont pas été intégrés dans un plan stratégique plus vaste concernant le paysage. Les États-Unis et l’Australie ont également développé des programmes pour gérer stratégiquement l’utilisation des visiteurs. En examinant ces approches, nous avons identifié certains points communs. Un cadre de gestion réussie de l’utilisation des visiteurs nécessite de solides données sur l’utilisation humaine et les sciences sociales pour comprendre les niveaux de fréquentation, les endroits où les gens vont et les formes de loisirs auxquelles ils participent. Les sciences sociales peuvent également permettre de comprendre les attentes et les motivations des visiteurs à visiter un parc, ce qui peut influencer les programmes de gestion. Des stratégies de gestion de l’utilisation des visiteurs bien étayées engagent les parties prenantes tout au long du processus. Tous les cadres reconnaissent qu’il existe des lacunes dans la compréhension des valeurs écologiques, sociales et culturelles des parcs ; ces lacunes peuvent être comblées dans un cadre qui commence par la création d’objectifs et de buts pour l’utilisation des visiteurs. Un cadre solide de gestion de l’utilisation des visiteurs nécessite également des programmes de surveillance dans le contexte de la gestion adaptative. Ce dernier élément permet de combler les lacunes des données, facilite l’expérimentation des options de gestion et permet une flexibilité pour affiner continuellement les stratégies de gestion afin d’avoir le plus grand effet positif possible sur l’expérience du parc et ses attributs écologiques. La mise en œuvre d’une stratégie de gestion de l’utilisation des visiteurs pour tout parc est un effort massif qui nécessite une collaboration fructueuse avec les parties prenantes externes, les gestionnaires du parc et le public canadien. Pour trouver des solutions à ces problèmes complexes, il est nécessaire d’essayer de nouvelles choses, de développer des relations nouvelles et significatives et de réévaluer les objectifs concernant l’expérience du visiteur.

CPAWS Southern Alberta a proposé un processus étape par étape qui engage les parties prenantes et aboutit à une stratégie de gestion de l’utilisation des visiteurs pour les unités de paysage dans les parcs nationaux des Rocheuses :

1. Identifier les objectifs de l’unité de gestion du paysage et les sujets d’évaluation pertinents aux impacts des visiteurs sur les valeurs naturelles

2. Donner la priorité aux biens et menaces naturels

3. Sélectionner des indicateurs et établir des seuils

4. Établir des stratégies de gestion

5. Mettre en œuvre, suivre, évaluer et ajuster

En plaçant les efforts de gestion existants dans le contexte d’une stratégie globale à l’échelle d’un paysage plus vaste, on peut contribuer à accroître l’efficacité de la gestion pour atteindre de multiples objectifs écologiques, sociaux et culturels. La SNAP fournira un bref aperçu du processus que nous proposons et engagera les gestionnaires de zones protégées dans une discussion sur la meilleure façon de travailler en collaboration avec les parties prenantes pour aborder cette question complexe.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Back to pre-summit material.

Retour à la matériel de pré-sommet.

An Adaptive Management Approach to Ecosystem Recovery – Managing Invasive Species at Kejimkujik NP & NHS

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Darrin Reid with Parks Canada – Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Darrin Reid avec Parcs Canada, Parc national et lieu historique national de Kejimkujik.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Enhancing ecosystem recovery in a manner that engages and benefits society is the underlying principle of Parks Canada’s Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe). Through this guiding principle, the CoRe Program is achieving the recovery of three ecosystems impacted by invasive species at Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site. Through open dialogue and collaboration with the Mi’kmaw of Nova Scotia, Kejimkujik is managing invasive species in its Coastal, Freshwater and Forest ecosystems. With evidence-based directed actions, Kejimkujik is coordinating and incorporating multi-disciplinary collaborative research, knowledge sharing and community engagement opportunities into an adaptive management approach. The invasive European green crab is well-established throughout the tidal estuaries found at Kejimkujik Seaside, and left unchecked, would re-engineer a coastal ecosystem functionally devoid of lush eelgrass beds and invertebrate life. By supporting local communities and researchers to find economic uses for green crab in the culinary, manufacturing and green economies, we are facilitating the diversification of markets for green crab and supporting a sustainable fishery for this invasive species. Chain pickerel and Small-mouth bass are threatening the functional diversity of Kejimkujik’s freshwater ecosystem with a high risk for native aquatic species including cascading impacts to species at risk and adjacent habitats. By building barriers to prevent further invasion, researching and understanding the fishes’ life history to improve management efficiency we are preventing entry of invasive fish into ecologically unique watersheds and keeping populations low to reduce the risk of expansion. The most recent invasive species to arrive in Kejimkujik is the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, a tiny aphid-like insect that exclusively targets hemlock trees, threatening the very foundation of Acadian forest ecosystems. Actions to manage the threat include selective silviculture, predator sampling for biocontrol research, prioritized assessment of key old growth stands, and restoration activities like tree planting and herbivory control. Each project is at a different stage of completion, however, the issue of invasive species impacts to ecosystem function and diversity is not new to conservation practitioners and is one that climate change will likely exacerbate. Parks Canada will present the adaptive management approach underlying each of Kejimkujik’s CoRe projects, results to date and lessons learned, highlighting the collaborative work in each project with our Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw partners. By sharing and applying developed expertise in promoting standards of practice, catalyzing innovation and communicating results to Canadians on the issue of invasive species, these efforts have resulted in significant conservation gains

ABSTRACT

Améliorer le rétablissement des écosystèmes d’une manière qui engage et profite à la société est le principe sous-jacent du programme de conservation et de restauration (CoRe) de Parcs Canada. Grâce à ce principe directeur, le programme CoRe permet de rétablir trois écosystèmes touchés par des espèces envahissantes au parc national et lieu historique national Kejimkujik. Grâce à un dialogue ouvert et à une collaboration avec les Mi’kmaw de Nouvelle-Écosse, Kejimkujik gère les espèces envahissantes dans ses écosystèmes côtiers, d’eau douce et forestiers. Grâce à des actions dirigées basées sur des preuves, Kejimkujik coordonne et intègre des recherches collaboratives multidisciplinaires, le partage des connaissances et les possibilités d’engagement communautaire dans une approche de gestion adaptative. Le crabe vert européen, espèce envahissante, est bien établi dans tous les estuaires à marée de Kejimkujik Bord de mer et, s’il n’est pas maîtrisé, il réorganisera un écosystème côtier fonctionnellement dépourvu de luxuriantes zostères et de vie invertébrée. En aidant les communautés locales et les chercheurs à trouver des utilisations économiques pour le crabe vert dans les domaines culinaire, manufacturier et de l’économie verte, nous facilitons la diversification des marchés du crabe vert et soutenons une pêche durable de cette espèce envahissante. Le brochet maillé et l’achigan à petite bouche menacent la diversité fonctionnelle de l’écosystème d’eau douce de Kejimkujik, avec un risque élevé pour les espèces aquatiques indigènes, notamment des impacts en cascade sur les espèces en péril et les habitats adjacents. En construisant des barrières pour empêcher d’autres invasions, en faisant des recherches et en comprenant le cycle de vie des poissons pour améliorer l’efficacité de la gestion, nous empêchons l’entrée de poissons envahissants dans des bassins hydrographiques uniques sur le plan écologique et nous maintenons les populations à un faible niveau pour réduire le risque d’expansion. L’espèce envahissante la plus récente à arriver à Kejimkujik est le puceron lanigère de la pruche, un minuscule insecte ressemblant à un puceron qui s’attaque exclusivement aux arbres de la pruche, menaçant ainsi le fondement même des écosystèmes forestiers acadiens. Les mesures visant à gérer cette menace comprennent la sylviculture sélective, l’échantillonnage des prédateurs pour la recherche sur le biocontrôle, l’évaluation prioritaire des principaux peuplements anciens et les activités de restauration comme la plantation d’arbres et la lutte contre les herbivores. Chaque projet est à un stade d’avancement différent, cependant, la question des impacts des espèces envahissantes sur la fonction et la diversité des écosystèmes n’est pas nouvelle pour les praticiens de la conservation et est un problème que le changement climatique va probablement exacerber. Parcs Canada présentera l’approche de gestion adaptative qui sous-tend chacun des projets CoRe de Kejimkujik, les résultats obtenus à ce jour et les leçons apprises, en soulignant le travail de collaboration dans chaque projet avec nos partenaires Mi’kmaw de Nouvelle-Écosse. En partageant et en appliquant l’expertise développée dans la promotion des normes de pratique, en catalysant l’innovation et en communiquant les résultats aux Canadiens sur la question des espèces envahissantes, ces efforts ont permis de réaliser des gains importants en matière de conservation.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Back to pre-summit material.

Retour à la matériel de pré-sommet.