Destination Canada Tools – Resources and Explorer Quotient

Destination Canada Resources and Explorer Quotient toolkit.

External Resource

Destination Canada Resources and Explorer Quotient Toolkit provides tourism businesses with valuable insights into why and how different people like to travel. Explorer Quotient goes beyond traditional market research of defining people. It looks deeper at individuals’ personal beliefs, social values and views of the world to learn exactly why different types of travellers seek out entirely different travel experiences.

Destination Canada Resources and Explorer Quotient toolkit.
Go to website.

Destination Canada Tourism Research

Destination Canada Tourism Research website.

External Resource

Destination Canada produces regular data, market intelligence and industry analysis to help businesses market to international travellers and grow Canada’s tourism industry. Most reports are updated monthly, quarterly or annually depending on the report type. Ad hoc reports, such as information on sectors are published as updated information is available.

Destination Canada Tourism Research website.
Go to website.

Destination Canada – Marketing Tips and Tricks

Destination Canada Marketing Tips and Tricks website.

External Resource

This video series is designed to help Canadian tourism business get the most out of their marketing efforts, reach travellers and remain competitive. The quick tutorials feature Destination Canada team members sharing their expertise.

Destination Canada Marketing Tips and Tricks website.
Go to website.

Nature Talks Podcast

Nature Talks Podcast

Fascinating stories about nature, why we need it in our lives, and the passionate Canadians helping to protect it. In this seven-part series, we’ll take listeners to some of Canada’s important natural areas, from the Bay of Fundy to Victoria. We talk to Canadians helping care for these places, from scientists to hometown heroes. Connect to Canada’s nature. Learn about the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s conservation work. And be inspired to find out how you can help support this work.

Canadian Mountain Podcast

Canadian Mountain Podcast

Canada’s extensive mountain regions provide a wide range of benefits to Canadians such as fresh water, biocultural diversity, natural resources, recreation, and cultural and spiritual connection and healing. The Canadian Mountain Podcast is where you can hear the latest stories and findings from the Canadian Mountain Network, a national research network dedicated to the resilience and health of Canada’s mountain peoples and places. Each episode is produced by journalism students at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta, and offers diverse perspectives from those living and working in our country’s varied and complex mountain regions. From academics to athletes and Indigenous Elders to policy makers, the Canadian Mountain Podcast brings you expert insights to explore the past, present, and future of mountain regions here in Canada and around the world.

Teaching Visitors How to Be ‘Bison Wise’ and ‘Bear Aware’: Best Practices and Lessons in Social Science for Behaviour Change

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

One of the most pressing and challenging issues of our modern era is educating people about the alarming effects of environmental issues such as climate change and helping them to understand the importance of taking action. The question remains as to how environmental educators can help ensure the public understands the science behind environmental issues, realize their role in addressing these issues, and feel empowered to do so (Ballantyne & Packer, 2005; 2011; Bueddefeld & Van Winkle, 2017; 2018; Hughes, 2013; Hughes, Packer, & Ballantyne, 2011). Biosphere reserves play an important role in educating people about environmental issues, encouraging an attachment to place, and facilitating meaningful pro-environmental behaviour change (UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada, 2019). Specifically, the UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada (2019) identifies that biospheres “are proof that a sustainable way of living is not only possible but already happening; provide local and scalable solutions to balance long-term conservation and sustainable use of natural resources; and inspire Canadians and all global citizens to replicate the practices modelled in biosphere reserves”. With these objectives in mind, Biosphere reserves need to be places for the public to learn tangible lessons in how to live harmoniously with nature and wildlife. Specifically, targeted programming, that is intended to help visitors learn how to safely interact with wildlife, is needed. This session will present the findings from a study conducted with a team of social scientists from the University of Alberta and the interpretive team from Elk Island National Park. The purpose of the research was to determine the efficacy of a dialogic-based interpretation approach to teach visitors how to become ‘Bison Wise’ and ‘Bear Aware’. Using principles from Transformative Learning Theory, Community-Based Social Marketing, and dialogic-narrative structures the research team worked with Parks Canada staff to determine key messages and related action outcomes (McKenzie-Mohr, 2000; Mezirow, 2012; Williams, Darville, & McBroom, 2018). With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the cancellation of all in person interpretation during the summer of 2020, the research team and Parks Canada Interpreters pivoted to create a short interpretive video using the dialogic-based narrative approach. With limited ability to contact visitors and low response rates the research team created an innovative mixed-methods approach to evaluate the success of the interpretive video. Results indicated that this approach was very effective in helping visitors to learn key messages and successfully demonstrate the ‘thumb rule’ and identify attractants. This presentation will focus on sharing the video created for this project and the storyboarding process used to incorporate key social science approaches to support visitor learning and behaviour change.

ABSTRACT

L’un des problèmes les plus urgents et les plus difficiles de notre époque moderne est d’éduquer les gens sur les effets alarmants des problèmes environnementaux tels que le changement climatique et de les aider à comprendre l’importance d’agir. La question demeure de savoir comment les éducateurs en environnement peuvent contribuer à faire en sorte que le public comprenne la science qui sous-tend les problèmes environnementaux, qu’il prenne conscience de son rôle dans la résolution de ces problèmes et qu’il se sente habilité à le faire (Ballantyne & Packer, 2005 ; 2011 ; Bueddefeld & Van Winkle, 2017 ; 2018 ; Hughes, 2013 ; Hughes, Packer, & Ballantyne, 2011). Les réserves de biosphère jouent un rôle important pour éduquer les gens sur les questions environnementales, encourager l’attachement à un lieu et faciliter un changement de comportement pro-environnemental significatif (UNESCO Biosphere Reserves of Canada, 2019). Plus précisément, les Réserves de biosphère de l’UNESCO au Canada (2019) identifient que les biosphères ” sont la preuve qu’un mode de vie durable est non seulement possible, mais qu’il existe déjà ; elles fournissent des solutions locales et évolutives pour équilibrer la conservation à long terme et l’utilisation durable des ressources naturelles ; et elles inspirent les Canadiens et tous les citoyens du monde à reproduire les pratiques modelées dans les réserves de biosphère ”. Avec ces objectifs en tête, les réserves de biosphère doivent être des endroits où le public peut apprendre des leçons tangibles sur la façon de vivre harmonieusement avec la nature et la faune. Plus précisément, il est nécessaire de mettre en place des programmes ciblés, destinés à aider les visiteurs à apprendre comment interagir en toute sécurité avec la faune. Cette séance présentera les résultats d’une étude menée par une équipe de spécialistes en sciences sociales de l’Université de l’Alberta et l’équipe d’interprétation du parc national Elk Island. L’objectif de la recherche était de déterminer l’efficacité d’une approche d’interprétation basée sur le dialogue pour enseigner aux visiteurs comment devenir “Bison Wise” et “Bear Aware”. En utilisant les principes de la théorie de l’apprentissage transformateur, du marketing social communautaire et des structures narratives dialogiques, l’équipe de recherche a travaillé avec le personnel de Parcs Canada pour déterminer les messages clés et les résultats d’action connexes (McKenzie-Mohr, 2000 ; Mezirow, 2012 ; Williams, Darville et McBroom, 2018). Avec le début de la pandémie de COVID-19 et l’annulation de toute interprétation en personne pendant l’été 2020, l’équipe de recherche et les interprètes de Parcs Canada ont pivoté pour créer une courte vidéo d’interprétation en utilisant l’approche narrative basée sur le dialogue. Avec une capacité limitée de contacter les visiteurs et de faibles taux de réponse, l’équipe de recherche a créé une approche innovante de méthodes mixtes pour évaluer le succès de la vidéo d’interprétation. Les résultats indiquent que cette approche a été très efficace pour aider les visiteurs à apprendre les messages clés et à démontrer avec succès la ” règle du pouce ” et à identifier les attraits. Cette présentation se concentrera sur le partage de la vidéo créée pour ce projet et sur le processus de storyboarding utilisé pour incorporer les approches clés des sciences sociales afin de soutenir l’apprentissage et le changement de comportement des visiteurs.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Trip Outcomes for Attendees of Park Interpretation Programs

The above was presented at the the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

What do you remember about that outdoor theatre show or guided hike from your last park camping trip? Were there immediate impacts or lasting outcomes? Most park and protected area agencies have mandates to provide education and appreciation opportunities as part of broader outdoor recreation experiences. However, many agencies do not fully assess how much they reach these goals. Alberta Parks is seeking scientific indicators to evaluate progress towards its objectives, which will assist in setting priorities, allocating budgets, and planning. Therefore, we sought to determine differences in trip outcomes between attendees and non-attendees of personal interpretation in Alberta’s provincial parks.

During the summers of 2018 and 2019, we randomly sampled respondents from 11 provincial parks in Alberta that offered personal interpretation programs. In total, we surveyed 1672 visitors in campgrounds (98% response rate) of which 763 had attended a personal interpretation event (e.g., outdoor theatre presentations, guided hikes, family programs, and bus tours) and 909 who had not. With reference to their current camping trip, we asked respondents to indicate their level of satisfaction, learning, attitudes towards certain park management issues, intentions to participate (and actual participation) in certain park behaviours, connections to place, and positive memories of their experience. In addition, we asked respondents about their trip and demographic characteristics.

In terms of trip outcomes, interpretation attendees reported greater satisfaction and larger knowledge gains from their park experiences than non-attendees. Attendees had more park-friendly attitudes than non-attendees for three of five park issues (e.g., feeding wild animals, asking fellow campers to keep campsites clean, and building smaller campfires). Attendees had greater intentions to engage in three of eight park-friendly behaviours (e.g., asking fellow campers to keep campsites clean, attend another interpretive program, and support parks in some way) than non-attendees. Attendees engaged more often in two of five park-friendly behaviours (e.g., tell fellow campers to keep their campsites clean) than non-attendees. Attendees and non-attendees did not differ regarding the outcomes of connections to place and developing positive memories.

Regarding demographic characteristics, program attendance was not associated with gender, but attendees were more educated and had more children in their groups than non-attendees. Program attendees were more motivated by learning about nature and enjoying nature than non-attendees, while non-attendees were more motivated by having fun and relaxing than attendees.

Consistent with other studies, our results showed significant impacts from interpretive programs on visitor satisfaction and enjoyment and moderate impacts on attitude change and behaviour change. These results can help improve planning, budgeting, programming, and marketing for interpretation by park agencies around the world.

ABSTRACT

Que vous rappelez-vous de ce spectacle de théâtre en plein air ou de cette randonnée guidée lors de votre dernière sortie en camping dans un parc ? Y a-t-il eu des impacts immédiats ou des résultats durables ? La plupart des organismes responsables des parcs et des aires protégées ont pour mandat d’offrir des possibilités d’éducation et d’appréciation dans le cadre d’expériences récréatives de plein air plus vastes. Cependant, de nombreux organismes n’évaluent pas pleinement dans quelle mesure ils atteignent ces objectifs. Alberta Parks est à la recherche d’indicateurs scientifiques pour évaluer les progrès réalisés dans l’atteinte de ses objectifs, ce qui l’aidera à établir des priorités, à allouer des budgets et à planifier. Nous avons donc cherché à déterminer les différences dans les résultats des voyages entre les participants et les non-participants à l’interprétation personnelle dans les parcs provinciaux de l’Alberta.

Au cours des étés 2018 et 2019, nous avons échantillonné de façon aléatoire les répondants de 11 parcs provinciaux de l’Alberta qui offraient des programmes d’interprétation personnelle. Au total, nous avons interrogé 1 672 visiteurs dans des terrains de camping (taux de réponse de 98 %), dont 763 avaient assisté à un événement d’interprétation personnelle (p. ex. présentations de théâtre en plein air, randonnées guidées, programmes familiaux et visites en autobus) et 909 qui ne l’avaient pas fait. En ce qui concerne leur voyage de camping actuel, nous avons demandé aux répondants d’indiquer leur niveau de satisfaction, leur apprentissage, leurs attitudes à l’égard de certaines questions liées à la gestion du parc, leurs intentions de participer (et leur participation réelle) à certains comportements dans le parc, leurs liens avec le lieu et les souvenirs positifs de leur expérience. En outre, nous avons interrogé les répondants sur leur voyage et leurs caractéristiques démographiques. En ce qui concerne les résultats du voyage, les participants à l’interprétation ont déclaré être plus satisfaits et avoir acquis davantage de connaissances grâce à leurs expériences dans les parcs que les non-participants. Les participants avaient des attitudes plus respectueuses des parcs que les non-participants pour trois des cinq problèmes liés aux parcs (par exemple, nourrir les animaux sauvages, demander aux autres campeurs de garder les emplacements propres et faire de petits feux de camp). Les participants avaient davantage l’intention d’adopter trois des huit comportements favorables aux parcs (p. ex., demander à d’autres campeurs de garder les emplacements propres, assister à un autre programme d’interprétation et soutenir les parcs d’une manière ou d’une autre) que les non-participants. Les participants ont adopté plus souvent que les non-participants deux des cinq comportements favorables aux parcs (p. ex., demander à d’autres campeurs de garder leur emplacement de camping propre). Les participants et les non-participants ne diffèrent pas en ce qui concerne les résultats relatifs aux liens avec le lieu et au développement de souvenirs positifs.

En ce qui concerne les caractéristiques démographiques, la participation au programme n’était pas associée au sexe, mais les participants étaient plus instruits et avaient plus d’enfants dans leur groupe que les non-participants. Les participants au programme étaient plus motivés par l’apprentissage et l’appréciation de la nature que les non-participants, tandis que les non-participants étaient plus motivés par l’amusement et la détente que les participants.

Conformément à d’autres études, nos résultats montrent que les programmes d’interprétation ont un impact significatif sur la satisfaction et le plaisir des visiteurs et un impact modéré sur le changement d’attitude et de comportement. Ces résultats peuvent contribuer à améliorer la planification, la budgétisation, la programmation et le marketing de l’interprétation par les agences des parcs du monde entier.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)