Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas Video

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas summary video YouTube

External Resource

As part of the process of Canada’s Pathway to Target 1, Indigenous Nations across turtle island in what is now known as Canada, came together in ethical space with the Federal and Provincial governments in ceremony and conference to discuss Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas in Stoney Nakoda / treaty 7 territory (Canmore, Alberta) October 2018. This short film highlights some of those discussions and the guiding principles, and is an excerpt from a longer film to be publicly released in Lkwungen territory of the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSÁNEĆ peoples (aka Victoria, BC) on April 17th, 2019 As part of the 35 year anniversary of the Meares Island Tribal Park.

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas summary video YouTube
Go to YouTube video.

Towards Reconciliation: 10 Calls to Action to Natural Scientists Working In Canadian Protected Areas

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Carmen Wong with Parks Canada, and Elder Mary Jane Gùdia) Johnson or Kluane First Nation. Click on the image below to see the full presentation.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Carmen Wong avec Parcs Canada, et l’aînée Mary Jane (Gùdia) Johnson ou la Première nation Kluane. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour voir la présentation complète.

Click to see full presentation.
Click to see full presentation.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

Many protected areas in Canada were created by the expulsion of Indigenous peoples from their traditional homelands. This history drives a need for reconciliation in all aspects of the management of protected areas. Here we reimagine how research could be conducted in Canadian protected areas by drawing on our recently published paper outlining 10 Calls to Action to natural scientists to enable reconciliation in Canada. This paper was written by an unique group of co-authors representing Indigenous and western science perspectives and fuelled by our critical review of the research field activities we have observed in northern Canada. Two co-authors, an Elder from Kluane First Nation and an ecologist for Parks Canada will present together the 10 Calls to Action and their specific implications for research and management activities in protected areas. Both co-authors have/are worked/working for Parks Canada and have been involved with the permitting process for research for over a decade in Kluane National Park and Reserve which is cooperatively managed with Kluane First Nation and Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. Original paper available online here: https://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139/facets-2020-0005

ABSTRACT

De nombreuses zones protégées au Canada ont été créées par l’expulsion des peuples indigènes de leurs terres traditionnelles. Cette histoire entraîne un besoin de réconciliation dans tous les aspects de la gestion des zones protégées. Nous imaginons ici comment la recherche pourrait être menée dans les zones protégées du Canada en nous appuyant sur notre document récemment publié, qui présente 10 appels à l’action adressés à des spécialistes des sciences naturelles pour permettre la réconciliation au Canada. Ce document a été rédigé par un groupe unique de co-auteurs représentant les perspectives des autochtones et de la science occidentale et alimenté par notre examen critique des activités de recherche sur le terrain que nous avons observées dans le nord du Canada. Deux co-auteurs, un aîné de la Première nation de Kluane et un écologiste de Parcs Canada, présenteront ensemble les 10 appels à l’action et leurs implications spécifiques pour les activités de recherche et de gestion dans les zones protégées. Les deux co-auteurs ont travaillé/travaillent pour Parcs Canada et ont été impliqués dans le processus d’autorisation des recherches depuis plus de dix ans dans le parc national et la réserve de Kluane, qui est géré en coopération avec la Première nation de Kluane et les Premières nations de Champagne et de Aishihik. L’article original est disponible en ligne ici : https://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139/facets-2020-0005

An Analysis of Knowledge Utilization for Managing National Parks

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Dr. Prabir Roy with Parks Canada. Click on the image below to enlarge.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Dr. Prabir Roy avec Parcs Canada. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.

An analysis of knowledge utilization for managing national parks. CPCIL Poster by Dr. Prabir Roy
Click to enlarge.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

When is knowledge power and when is it not? Since 1960, Parks Canada Agency (PCA) land and waters have been serving as an excellent place for natural setting experimentation by researchers (aka “the knowers”). Despite the tremendous advancements in Western science, natural resource managers (aka “the doers”) are facing challenges in managing diverse and rare species, and their habitat in the face of changing climate, and societal need. Academic research is often focused on single species dynamics and has concentrated on reductionism; the sustainable management of species relies on holistic knowledge based on species interactions with physical, biotic, and societal factors. Therefore, generated knowledge either loses the power to address the systemic cause of the environmental managements challenges or the knowledge is no longer the most applicable. Evolutionists predict that animals can react to climate change in one of three ways: move, adapt, or die. For example, herptofauna (reptiles) are very sensitive to small changes of temperature and more susceptible to minor indicators of climate change. Doers are trying to give extra space for species adaptation or to adapt to the change based on feasibility. But in reality, it remains unsolved because we struggle hard to understand which change is not real and what initially appears otherwise but is real change. This is because conservation studies start from the organism as a basic unit while in the medical world, it starts from DNA. Can we utilize the opportunity of the application of environmental DNA? Managers need precise, predictable, and more accurate knowledge that helps with proactive management. For example, predictions of the Great Lakes water-level fluctuations are essential for the sustainability of shoreline ecosystem management, asset maintenance, habitat availability for wetlands rare species, etc. Therefore, we need to go above and beyond to address our complex challenges and their interrelationships. Today, the PCA acknowledges that the incorporation of varieties of knowledge in managing the PCA land/waters that can increase the effectiveness of academic research findings. This includes, but is not limited to, all types of information generated either by monitoring and conducting academic experimentation, reviewing the literature, exploring stories narrated by Indigenous elders, seeking the opinion(s) of the public and PCA collaborators because they are truly helpful for managing Canadian national parks. There is an intersection of Indigenous knowledge (IK) and Western science. Western refers to “involution to evolution”, where involution refers to the manifestation of existence. Indigenous knowledge points out the creator has created life. When nature cycles back from manifest to un-manifest state or new manifestation the reductionist points out these changes without knowing the definitive cause, evolution. Within the current system of knowledge seeking and its mobilization, we have a limited capacity to better understand the challenges and to identify knowledge need to tackle these challenges. We, both doers and knowers, must build a framework that will guide us to better understand the doers’ challenge, identify the priority of knowledge and sources, utilize knowledge in real-time and on an appropriate scale, and to measure the knowledge efficiency.

ABSTRACT

Quand le savoir est-il un pouvoir et quand ne l’est-il pas ? Depuis 1960, les terres et les eaux de l’Agence Parcs Canada (APC) constituent un excellent lieu d’expérimentation en milieu naturel pour les chercheurs (alias “les connaisseurs”). Malgré les progrès considérables de la science occidentale, les gestionnaires des ressources naturelles (aussi appelés “les faiseurs”) sont confrontés à des défis dans la gestion d’espèces diverses et rares, et de leur habitat, face au changement climatique et aux besoins de la société. La recherche universitaire est souvent axée sur la dynamique d’une seule espèce et s’est concentrée sur le réductionnisme ; la gestion durable des espèces repose sur une connaissance holistique basée sur les interactions entre les espèces et les facteurs physiques, biotiques et sociétaux. Par conséquent, soit les connaissances générées perdent le pouvoir de traiter la cause systémique des problèmes de gestion de l’environnement, soit elles ne sont plus les plus applicables. Les évolutionnistes prédisent que les animaux peuvent réagir au changement climatique de trois façons : se déplacer, s’adapter ou mourir. Par exemple, l’herptofaune (reptiles) est très sensible aux petits changements de température et plus sensible aux indicateurs mineurs du changement climatique. Les responsables tentent de donner plus de place aux espèces pour s’adapter ou de s’adapter au changement en fonction de la faisabilité. Mais en réalité, la question reste sans réponse car nous avons beaucoup de mal à comprendre quel changement n’est pas réel et ce qui, au départ, semble être un autre changement mais qui est réel. En effet, les études de conservation partent de l’organisme comme unité de base alors que dans le monde médical, elles partent de l’ADN. Pouvons-nous utiliser l’opportunité de l’application de l’ADN environnemental ? Les gestionnaires ont besoin de connaissances précises, prévisibles et plus exactes qui aident à une gestion proactive. Par exemple, les prévisions des fluctuations du niveau d’eau des Grands Lacs sont essentielles pour la durabilité de la gestion des écosystèmes côtiers, le maintien des actifs, la disponibilité des habitats pour les espèces rares des zones humides, etc. Par conséquent, nous devons aller au-delà pour relever nos défis complexes et leurs interrelations. Aujourd’hui, l’APC reconnaît que l’intégration de diverses connaissances dans la gestion des terres/eaux de l’APC peut accroître l’efficacité des résultats de la recherche universitaire. Cela inclut, sans s’y limiter, tous les types d’informations générées soit par la surveillance et la conduite d’expérimentations universitaires, la revue de la littérature, l’exploration des histoires racontées par les anciens autochtones, la recherche de l’opinion (ou des opinions) du public et des collaborateurs de l’APC car elles sont vraiment utiles pour la gestion des parcs nationaux canadiens. Il existe un croisement entre le savoir indigène (IK) et la science occidentale. La science occidentale fait référence à “l’involution vers l’évolution”, où l’involution se réfère à la manifestation de l’existence. Le savoir indigène souligne que le créateur a créé la vie. Lorsque la nature passe d’un état manifeste à un état non manifeste ou à une nouvelle manifestation, le réductionniste souligne ces changements sans en connaître la cause définitive, l’évolution. Dans le système actuel de recherche de connaissances et de mobilisation de celles-ci, nous avons une capacité limitée à mieux comprendre les défis et à identifier les connaissances nécessaires pour relever ces défis. Nous, tant ceux qui font que ceux qui savent, devons construire un cadre qui nous guidera pour mieux comprendre le défi des faiseurs, identifier la priorité des connaissances et des sources, utiliser les connaissances en temps réel et à une échelle appropriée, et mesurer l’efficacité des connaissances.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite).

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

An Adaptive Management Approach to Ecosystem Recovery – Managing Invasive Species at Kejimkujik NP & NHS

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Darrin Reid with Parks Canada – Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Darrin Reid avec Parcs Canada, Parc national et lieu historique national de Kejimkujik.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Enhancing ecosystem recovery in a manner that engages and benefits society is the underlying principle of Parks Canada’s Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe). Through this guiding principle, the CoRe Program is achieving the recovery of three ecosystems impacted by invasive species at Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site. Through open dialogue and collaboration with the Mi’kmaw of Nova Scotia, Kejimkujik is managing invasive species in its Coastal, Freshwater and Forest ecosystems. With evidence-based directed actions, Kejimkujik is coordinating and incorporating multi-disciplinary collaborative research, knowledge sharing and community engagement opportunities into an adaptive management approach. The invasive European green crab is well-established throughout the tidal estuaries found at Kejimkujik Seaside, and left unchecked, would re-engineer a coastal ecosystem functionally devoid of lush eelgrass beds and invertebrate life. By supporting local communities and researchers to find economic uses for green crab in the culinary, manufacturing and green economies, we are facilitating the diversification of markets for green crab and supporting a sustainable fishery for this invasive species. Chain pickerel and Small-mouth bass are threatening the functional diversity of Kejimkujik’s freshwater ecosystem with a high risk for native aquatic species including cascading impacts to species at risk and adjacent habitats. By building barriers to prevent further invasion, researching and understanding the fishes’ life history to improve management efficiency we are preventing entry of invasive fish into ecologically unique watersheds and keeping populations low to reduce the risk of expansion. The most recent invasive species to arrive in Kejimkujik is the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, a tiny aphid-like insect that exclusively targets hemlock trees, threatening the very foundation of Acadian forest ecosystems. Actions to manage the threat include selective silviculture, predator sampling for biocontrol research, prioritized assessment of key old growth stands, and restoration activities like tree planting and herbivory control. Each project is at a different stage of completion, however, the issue of invasive species impacts to ecosystem function and diversity is not new to conservation practitioners and is one that climate change will likely exacerbate. Parks Canada will present the adaptive management approach underlying each of Kejimkujik’s CoRe projects, results to date and lessons learned, highlighting the collaborative work in each project with our Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw partners. By sharing and applying developed expertise in promoting standards of practice, catalyzing innovation and communicating results to Canadians on the issue of invasive species, these efforts have resulted in significant conservation gains

ABSTRACT

Améliorer le rétablissement des écosystèmes d’une manière qui engage et profite à la société est le principe sous-jacent du programme de conservation et de restauration (CoRe) de Parcs Canada. Grâce à ce principe directeur, le programme CoRe permet de rétablir trois écosystèmes touchés par des espèces envahissantes au parc national et lieu historique national Kejimkujik. Grâce à un dialogue ouvert et à une collaboration avec les Mi’kmaw de Nouvelle-Écosse, Kejimkujik gère les espèces envahissantes dans ses écosystèmes côtiers, d’eau douce et forestiers. Grâce à des actions dirigées basées sur des preuves, Kejimkujik coordonne et intègre des recherches collaboratives multidisciplinaires, le partage des connaissances et les possibilités d’engagement communautaire dans une approche de gestion adaptative. Le crabe vert européen, espèce envahissante, est bien établi dans tous les estuaires à marée de Kejimkujik Bord de mer et, s’il n’est pas maîtrisé, il réorganisera un écosystème côtier fonctionnellement dépourvu de luxuriantes zostères et de vie invertébrée. En aidant les communautés locales et les chercheurs à trouver des utilisations économiques pour le crabe vert dans les domaines culinaire, manufacturier et de l’économie verte, nous facilitons la diversification des marchés du crabe vert et soutenons une pêche durable de cette espèce envahissante. Le brochet maillé et l’achigan à petite bouche menacent la diversité fonctionnelle de l’écosystème d’eau douce de Kejimkujik, avec un risque élevé pour les espèces aquatiques indigènes, notamment des impacts en cascade sur les espèces en péril et les habitats adjacents. En construisant des barrières pour empêcher d’autres invasions, en faisant des recherches et en comprenant le cycle de vie des poissons pour améliorer l’efficacité de la gestion, nous empêchons l’entrée de poissons envahissants dans des bassins hydrographiques uniques sur le plan écologique et nous maintenons les populations à un faible niveau pour réduire le risque d’expansion. L’espèce envahissante la plus récente à arriver à Kejimkujik est le puceron lanigère de la pruche, un minuscule insecte ressemblant à un puceron qui s’attaque exclusivement aux arbres de la pruche, menaçant ainsi le fondement même des écosystèmes forestiers acadiens. Les mesures visant à gérer cette menace comprennent la sylviculture sélective, l’échantillonnage des prédateurs pour la recherche sur le biocontrôle, l’évaluation prioritaire des principaux peuplements anciens et les activités de restauration comme la plantation d’arbres et la lutte contre les herbivores. Chaque projet est à un stade d’avancement différent, cependant, la question des impacts des espèces envahissantes sur la fonction et la diversité des écosystèmes n’est pas nouvelle pour les praticiens de la conservation et est un problème que le changement climatique va probablement exacerber. Parcs Canada présentera l’approche de gestion adaptative qui sous-tend chacun des projets CoRe de Kejimkujik, les résultats obtenus à ce jour et les leçons apprises, en soulignant le travail de collaboration dans chaque projet avec nos partenaires Mi’kmaw de Nouvelle-Écosse. En partageant et en appliquant l’expertise développée dans la promotion des normes de pratique, en catalysant l’innovation et en communiquant les résultats aux Canadiens sur la question des espèces envahissantes, ces efforts ont permis de réaliser des gains importants en matière de conservation.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Back to pre-summit material.

Retour à la matériel de pré-sommet.

Re-Centering the Sacred in Relationship to Co-Management and Parks

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Chantelle Spicer with Simon Fraser University. Click the image below to view content.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Chantelle Spicer de l’Université Simon Fraser. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour voir le contenu.


Click to view.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

The presentation will be based on my masters research with Snuneymuxw First Nation and Saysutshun (or Newcastle Island Provincial Marine Park in BC). Ultimately what the project argues is that what is happening in co-management cannot be the only way forward for “reconciliation” or national self-determination for Indigenous peoples. What has been observed through fieldwork, which included interviews with citizens of Snuneymuxw and much time with the island itself is that too much of the current co-management agreement is controlled by a colonial heart. If these relationships are to meet the needs of the nation in attaining self-determination, much needs to be done to to transform what is at the heart of these agreements to include Indigenous and place-specific processes. This project drew on a diversity of Indigenous research methodologies and anthropological theory.

ABSTRACT

La présentation sera basée sur mes recherches de maîtrise avec la Première nation Snuneymuxw et Saysutshun (ou le parc marin provincial de Newcastle Island en Colombie-Britannique). En fin de compte, le projet soutient que ce qui se passe dans la cogestion ne peut pas être la seule façon d’avancer vers la “réconciliation” ou l’autodétermination nationale des peuples autochtones. Ce qui a été observé sur le terrain, avec des entretiens avec des citoyens snuneymuxw et beaucoup de temps passé sur l’île elle-même, c’est qu’une trop grande partie de l’accord de cogestion actuel est contrôlée par un cœur colonial. Si ces relations doivent répondre aux besoins de la nation pour atteindre l’autodétermination, il faut faire beaucoup pour transformer ce qui est au cœur de ces accords afin d’y inclure des processus indigènes et spécifiques au lieu. Ce projet s’est appuyé sur une diversité de méthodologies de recherche indigènes et de théories anthropologiques.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Back to pre-summit material.

Retour à la matériel de pré-sommet.

National Park Service Collaboration Handbook

External Resource

This handbook presents an overview of 10 core lessons for improved collaboration. These lessons encompass the lifespan of a collaborative effort, starting with internal capacity building practices, moving to forming new collaborations, and ending with sustaining collaborative initiatives. The lessons include stories, tools, and discussion points that can help park professionals incorporate the lessons into their work.

Go to handbook.