Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target.

Canada and Aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader targets

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P.

First Published Mar, 2021

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

A renewed global agenda to address biodiversity loss was sanctioned by adoption of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets in 2010 by Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. However, Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 contained a significant policy and reporting challenge, conceding that both protected areas (PAs) and ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ (OEABCMs) could be used to meet national targets of protecting 17 and 10 % of terrestrial and marine areas, respectively. We report on a consensus-based approach used to (1) operationalize OEABCMs in the Canadian context and (2) develop a decision-screening tool to assess sites for inclusion in Canada’s Aichi Target 11 commitment. Participants in workshops determined that for OEABCMs to be effective, they must share a core set of traits with PAs, consistent with the intent of Target 11. (1) Criteria for inclusion of OEABCMs in the Target 11 commitment should be consistent with the overall intent of PAs, with the exception that they may be governed by regimes not previously recognized by reporting agencies. (2) These areas should have an expressed objective to conserve nature, be long-term, generate effective nature conservation outcomes, and have governance regimes that ensure effective management. A decision-screening tool was developed that can reduce the risk that areas with limited conservation value are included in national accounting. The findings are relevant to jurisdictions where the debate on what can count is distracting Parties to the Convention from reaching conservation goals.

Citation Details

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P. (2015). Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target. Biodiversity and Conservation, 24(14), 3559-3581. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

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The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda

The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda

Christopher J. Lemieux, Mark W. Groulx, Rachel T. Buxton, Catherine E. Reining, Clara-Jane (C.J.) Blye, Nadha Hassen, Sara-Lynn (Penina) Harding, Elizabeth A. Halpenny, Melissa Lem, Sonya L. Jakubec, Pamela Wright, Tonya Makletzoff, Mara Kerry, Karen Keenleyside, Pascale Salah van der Leest, Jill Bueddefeld, Raynald (Harvey) Lemelin, Don Carruthers Den Hoed, Brad Steinberg, Rike Moon, Jacqueline Scott, Jennifer Grant, Zahrah Khan, Dawn Carr, Lisa McLaughlin and Richard Krehbiel

First Published May, 2022

DOI: 10.2305/IUCN.CH.2022.PARKS‐28‐1CJL.en

In this article, we outline progress and challenges in establishing effective health promotion tied to visitor experiences provided by protected and conserved areas in Canada. Despite an expanding global evidence base, case studies focused on aspects of health and well-being within Canada’s protected and conserved areas remain limited. Data pertaining to motivations, barriers and experiences of visitors are often not collected by governing agencies and, if collected, are not made generally available or reported on. There is an obvious, large gap in research and action focused on the needs and rights of groups facing systemic barriers related to a variety of issues including, but not limited to, access, nature experiences, and needs with respect to health and well-being outcomes. Activation of programmes at the site level continue to grow, and Park Prescription programmes, as well as changes to the Accessible Canada Act, represent significant, positive examples of recent cross-sector policy integration. Evaluations of outcomes associated with HPHP programmes have not yet occurred but will be important to adapting interventions and informing cross-sector capacity building. We conclude by providing an overview of gaps in evidence and practice that, if addressed, can lead to more effective human health promotion vis-à-vis nature contact in protected and conserved areas in Canada.


Key words: protected areas, conserved areas, human health, well-being, promotion, policy, equity, inclusion, nature

Citation Details

Lemieux, C. et al. (2022). The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda. International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation. 21 (1) doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/csp2.12654

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This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the original published site.

ParkSeek Project Update

The above was presented at the February 22 – 25, 2022 Research eSummit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au eSommet de Recherche du 22 au 25 février 2022.

(résumé et vidéo en français ci-dessous)

ABSTRACT

Parks and recreational facilities in the Canadian context are critically important to health and wellbeing as they typically provide opportunities to connect with nature, pursue recreational activities, and facilitate social connections for the entire population.

The ParkSeek project (parkseek.ca) through three distinct objectives aims to establish new datasets, tools, and communities of practice around the population health benefits of parks and recreational facilities. The first objective is to analyze the geographic accessibility of parks and recreational facilities to create a set of open-access measures. The second objective is to collect information about the quality of parks and recreational facilities from a culturally and regionally representative sample of park and recreational facility users in communities across Canada. The third objective is to develop a searchable database of strategic and operational policies, analyzed through a health equity lens, explicitly related to parks and recreation in Canada. Join us for this rapid talk session to learn about our progress, and where the project is headed in 2022 and beyond!

ABSTRACT

Dans le contexte canadien, les parcs et les installations récréatives sont d’une importance capitale pour la santé et le bien-être, car ils offrent généralement des possibilités de contact avec la nature, de pratiquer des activités récréatives et de faciliter les liens sociaux pour l’ensemble de la population.

Le projet ParkSeek (parkseek.ca) vise, par le biais de trois objectifs distincts, à établir de nouveaux ensembles de données, outils et communautés de pratique autour des avantages des parcs et des installations récréatives pour la santé de la population. Le premier objectif est d’analyser l’accessibilité géographique des parcs et des installations récréatives afin de créer un ensemble de mesures en libre accès. Le deuxième objectif est de recueillir des informations sur la qualité des parcs et des installations récréatives auprès d’un échantillon culturellement et régionalement représentatif d’utilisateurs de parcs et d’installations récréatives dans les communautés du Canada. Le troisième objectif est de développer une base de données consultable de politiques stratégiques et opérationnelles, analysées à travers une lentille d’équité en santé, explicitement liées aux parcs et aux loisirs au Canada. Joignez-vous à nous pour cette séance de discussion rapide afin d’en savoir plus sur nos progrès et sur l’orientation du projet en 2022 et au-delà!