Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target.

Canada and Aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader targets

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P.

First Published Mar, 2021

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

A renewed global agenda to address biodiversity loss was sanctioned by adoption of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets in 2010 by Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. However, Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 contained a significant policy and reporting challenge, conceding that both protected areas (PAs) and ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ (OEABCMs) could be used to meet national targets of protecting 17 and 10 % of terrestrial and marine areas, respectively. We report on a consensus-based approach used to (1) operationalize OEABCMs in the Canadian context and (2) develop a decision-screening tool to assess sites for inclusion in Canada’s Aichi Target 11 commitment. Participants in workshops determined that for OEABCMs to be effective, they must share a core set of traits with PAs, consistent with the intent of Target 11. (1) Criteria for inclusion of OEABCMs in the Target 11 commitment should be consistent with the overall intent of PAs, with the exception that they may be governed by regimes not previously recognized by reporting agencies. (2) These areas should have an expressed objective to conserve nature, be long-term, generate effective nature conservation outcomes, and have governance regimes that ensure effective management. A decision-screening tool was developed that can reduce the risk that areas with limited conservation value are included in national accounting. The findings are relevant to jurisdictions where the debate on what can count is distracting Parties to the Convention from reaching conservation goals.

Citation Details

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P. (2015). Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target. Biodiversity and Conservation, 24(14), 3559-3581. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

d10030254

About Open Access Peer Reviewed Resources

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the original published site.

Canada’s Conserved Areas: Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators

2019 Canada Conserved Areas

Guiding Document

Well-managed conserved areas help preserve species and their habitats for present and future generations by reducing direct human development stresses. Conserved areas play a vital role in conserving Canada’s nature. They also provide opportunities for people to connect with nature. The indicators track the amount and proportion of area conserved in Canada.

2019 Canada Conserved Areas
Go to website.

Enhancing Canada’s Climate Change Ambition with Natural Climate Solutions

Enhancing Canada's Climate Change Ambitions with Natural Climate Solutions report

Guiding Document

This report provides 5 recommendations for Canada to enhance its climate change ambitions in the short-term (i.e. to 2030) using Natural Climate Solutions. The most effective short term action is to protect intact carbon-dense/high biodiversity ecosystems, including primary forests, grasslands, eelgrass beds and saltmarshes. Canada is one of the few countries in the world that still has enough intact ecosystems to achieve this.

Enhancing Canada's Climate Change Ambitions with Natural Climate Solutions report
Go to report.

Guiding Principles & Best Practices for South Carolina Nonprofits

Together SC’s Guiding Principles & Best Practices is written to meet the general needs of all nonprofit organizations – large and small. We aim to provide nonprofit leaders with a reference to navigate board and staff responsibilities and accountabilities, whether the organization is just starting out or is well-established.

Continue reading

Ecology and Distribution of Eastern Waterfan (Peltigera Hydrothyria) in Atlantic Canada

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Neil Vinson with Parks Canada. Click on the image below to enlarge.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Neil Vinson avec Parcs Canada. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.


CPCIL eposter Eastern Waterfan Parks Canada
Click to enlarge.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Eastern Waterfan is a rare lichen only found in Eastern North America. In Canada, it is only found in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Quebec. Eastern Waterfan is classified as Threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and the Species at Risk Act (SARA). Amazingly, new monitoring has found that approximately 50% of the total Canadian population of Eastern Waterfan occurs within Fundy National Park! Lichens are a co-dependent relationship between a fungus and an alga/cyanobacteria. The alga or cyanobacteria produces food through photosynthesis. The fungus provides protection while absorbing the food. This allows the lichen to live in areas that neither species would be able to live in alone. Eastern Waterfan uses cyanobacteria (Capsosira lowei) to produce food and is one of the few leafy lichens that can grow underwater. Eastern Waterfan has a purple, leafy appearance. Fan-shaped veins support the underside of the body. The lichen is attached to rocks at or just below water level by spongy bundles of fibres. Round spore-producing structures are red-brown in colour and are found on the leafy edge of the lichen. Eastern Waterfan grows in cool, clear, partially shaded streams. It is usually found in protected backwaters out of the main current. Colonies are very slow growing and take over 10 years to establish. Tree cover over the Dickson Brook Watershed in Fundy National Park keeps the water cool, the air humid, and limits the amount of soil deposited into the stream due to erosion. These characteristics make Dickson Brook ideal for Eastern Waterfan to grow. In 2013, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) reported a Canadian population of +/- 1,282 mature individuals and stated it was “doubtful if Canadian population will exceed 2000 colonies”. The new findings in 2019 saw over 800 observations in 28 brooks in Fundy National Park. This has resulted in >1000 colonies or 50% of known Canadian population in Fundy National Park.

ABSTRACT

L’Eastern Waterfan est un lichen rare que l’on ne trouve que dans l’est de l’Amérique du Nord. Au Canada, il n’est présent qu’au Nouveau-Brunswick, en Nouvelle-Écosse et au Québec. La Vanne de l’Est est classée comme menacée par le Comité sur la situation des espèces en péril au Canada (COSEPAC) et par la Loi sur les espèces en péril (LEP). Étonnamment, de nouvelles études ont montré qu’environ 50 % de la population canadienne totale de cette espèce se trouve dans le parc national de Fundy ! Les lichens sont une relation de codépendance entre un champignon et une algue/cyanobactérie. L’algue ou la cyanobactérie produit de la nourriture par photosynthèse. Le champignon offre une protection tout en absorbant la nourriture. Cela permet au lichen de vivre dans des zones où aucune espèce ne pourrait vivre seule. L’Eastern Waterfan utilise des cyanobactéries (Capsosira lowei) pour produire de la nourriture et est l’un des rares lichens feuillus qui peuvent se développer sous l’eau. L’Eastern Waterfan a un aspect pourpre et feuillu. Des veines en forme d’éventail soutiennent le dessous du corps. Le lichen est fixé aux rochers au niveau de l’eau ou juste en dessous par des faisceaux de fibres spongieuses. Les structures rondes productrices de spores sont de couleur rouge-brun et se trouvent sur le bord feuillu du lichen. L’aigle royal pousse dans les cours d’eau frais, clairs et partiellement ombragés. On le trouve généralement dans les eaux secondaires protégées, en dehors du courant principal. Les colonies ont une croissance très lente et mettent plus de 10 ans à s’établir. Le couvert végétal du bassin versant du ruisseau Dickson, dans le parc national de Fundy, maintient l’eau fraîche, l’air humide et limite la quantité de sol déposée dans le ruisseau par l’érosion. Ces caractéristiques font du ruisseau Dickson l’endroit idéal pour la croissance des oiseaux aquatiques de l’Est. En 2013, le Comité sur la situation des espèces en péril au Canada (COSEPAC) a fait état d’une population canadienne de +/- 1 282 individus matures et a déclaré qu’il était “douteux que la population canadienne dépasse 2 000 colonies”. Les nouveaux résultats de 2019 ont permis de faire plus de 800 observations dans 28 ruisseaux du parc national de Fundy. Cela a donné plus de 1000 colonies, soit 50% de la population canadienne connue dans le parc national de Fundy.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Atlantic Park Salmon Recovery

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Danielle Latendresse with Parks Canada. Click on the image below to enlarge.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Danielle Latendresse avec Parcs Canada. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.


CPCIL ePoster Atlantic Salmon Parks Canada
Click to enlarge.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

The Atlantic Parks Salmon Recovery Program includes five National Parks aiming to improve wild salmon abundance and restore ecological integrity in Atlantic national parks where salmon populations are currently in various stages of decline. This collaborative restoration program is aligning Indigenous perspectives, restoration knowledge, academic capacity, communications resources, and partner networks to achieve a common goal. Recent salmon restoration actions at Parks Canada sites have resulted in the re-establishment of wild juveniles, ecosystem productivity and increased natural adult returns in some rivers. To build on that success, this project began in 2019 “NASCO Year of the Salmon” by determining elements of successful recovery methods and producing a best practices approach. Each park then developed independent salmon restoration actions through the conservation standards framework which are complementary to the best practices and appropriately scaled for each site’s population status. Published restoration principles that maximize the wild fitness of the native stock inform the design of our actions. The final product is a project working at multiple scales simultaneously to provide empirical data which will guide future management decisions on the optimal timing of intervention for a declining population. Connecting projects and networks through common measures of success will allow a unique opportunity to evaluate restoration action effectiveness across different population statuses.

ABSTRACT

Le programme de rétablissement du saumon des parcs atlantiques comprend cinq parcs nationaux visant à améliorer l’abondance du saumon sauvage et à restaurer l’intégrité écologique dans les parcs nationaux de l’Atlantique où les populations de saumon sont actuellement à divers stades de déclin. Ce programme de restauration en collaboration aligne les perspectives indigènes, les connaissances en matière de restauration, les capacités universitaires, les ressources de communication et les réseaux de partenaires pour atteindre un objectif commun. Les récentes mesures de restauration du saumon sur les sites de Parcs Canada ont permis de rétablir les juvéniles sauvages, la productivité de l’écosystème et d’augmenter les retours naturels d’adultes dans certaines rivières. Pour tirer parti de cette réussite, ce projet a débuté en 2019, “Année du saumon” de l’OCSAN, en déterminant les éléments des méthodes de rétablissement réussies et en produisant une approche des meilleures pratiques. Chaque parc a ensuite élaboré des mesures indépendantes de restauration du saumon dans le cadre des normes de conservation, qui sont complémentaires aux meilleures pratiques et adaptées à l’état de la population de chaque site. Les principes de restauration publiés qui maximisent l’état sauvage du stock indigène guident la conception de nos actions. Le produit final est un projet travaillant à plusieurs échelles simultanément pour fournir des données empiriques qui guideront les futures décisions de gestion sur le moment optimal d’intervention pour une population en déclin. La connexion des projets et des réseaux par le biais de mesures communes de réussite offrira une occasion unique d’évaluer l’efficacité des mesures de restauration dans différents statuts de population.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Living Lab Program for Climate Change and Conservation – A Case Study Of Putting Research Into Practice

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Jen Grant with BC Parks. Click on the image below to enlarge.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Jen Grant avec BC Parcs. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.


BC Parks Living Lab Program Climate Change 2021
Click to enlarge.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Tackling the challenges associated with climate change requires leadership, collaboration, and connection; no single organization or agency can mitigate and adapt to the impacts alone. BC Parks manages 1,033 protected areas covering more than 14 million hectares. As a relatively small agency, BC Parks relies on academic, community, Indigenous and government partners to better understand and adapt to climate change.

This presentation showcases a collaborative program called the Living Lab Program for Climate Change and Conservation. Initiated in 2017, the Program offers seed funding to academic partners who can conduct strategic climate research in BC’s parks and protected areas. The poster will demonstrate how the Program is helping BC Parks assess and enhance the ecological resilience of the provincial protected are system and how it is raising awareness and building staff capacity to take informed action. The poster will also include a “research to practice” case study on novel and disappearing climates to demonstrate how BC Parks staff are learning from and incorporating research findings into protected area management planning and operations, and into collaborative work with indigenous partners.

ABSTRACT

Pour relever les défis liés au changement climatique, il faut du leadership, de la collaboration et des liens ; aucune organisation ou agence ne peut à elle seule atténuer les impacts et s’y adapter. BC Parks gère 1 033 zones protégées couvrant plus de 14 millions d’hectares. En tant qu’agence relativement petite, BC Parks s’appuie sur des partenaires universitaires, communautaires, autochtones et gouvernementaux pour mieux comprendre le changement climatique et s’y adapter.

Cette présentation présente un programme de collaboration appelé “Living Lab Program for Climate Change and Conservation”. Lancé en 2017, le programme offre un financement de démarrage aux partenaires universitaires qui peuvent mener des recherches stratégiques sur le climat dans les parcs et les zones protégées de la Colombie-Britannique. L’affiche montrera comment le programme aide BC Parks à évaluer et à améliorer la résilience écologique du système provincial de zones protégées et comment il sensibilise le personnel et renforce ses capacités à agir en connaissance de cause. L’affiche comprendra également une étude de cas “de la recherche à la pratique” sur les nouveaux climats et les climats en voie de disparition afin de démontrer comment le personnel de BC Parks tire des enseignements et intègre les résultats de la recherche dans la planification et les opérations de gestion des zones protégées, ainsi que dans le travail de collaboration avec les partenaires autochtones.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

An Analysis of Knowledge Utilization for Managing National Parks

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Dr. Prabir Roy with Parks Canada. Click on the image below to enlarge.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Dr. Prabir Roy avec Parcs Canada. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.

An analysis of knowledge utilization for managing national parks. CPCIL Poster by Dr. Prabir Roy
Click to enlarge.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

When is knowledge power and when is it not? Since 1960, Parks Canada Agency (PCA) land and waters have been serving as an excellent place for natural setting experimentation by researchers (aka “the knowers”). Despite the tremendous advancements in Western science, natural resource managers (aka “the doers”) are facing challenges in managing diverse and rare species, and their habitat in the face of changing climate, and societal need. Academic research is often focused on single species dynamics and has concentrated on reductionism; the sustainable management of species relies on holistic knowledge based on species interactions with physical, biotic, and societal factors. Therefore, generated knowledge either loses the power to address the systemic cause of the environmental managements challenges or the knowledge is no longer the most applicable. Evolutionists predict that animals can react to climate change in one of three ways: move, adapt, or die. For example, herptofauna (reptiles) are very sensitive to small changes of temperature and more susceptible to minor indicators of climate change. Doers are trying to give extra space for species adaptation or to adapt to the change based on feasibility. But in reality, it remains unsolved because we struggle hard to understand which change is not real and what initially appears otherwise but is real change. This is because conservation studies start from the organism as a basic unit while in the medical world, it starts from DNA. Can we utilize the opportunity of the application of environmental DNA? Managers need precise, predictable, and more accurate knowledge that helps with proactive management. For example, predictions of the Great Lakes water-level fluctuations are essential for the sustainability of shoreline ecosystem management, asset maintenance, habitat availability for wetlands rare species, etc. Therefore, we need to go above and beyond to address our complex challenges and their interrelationships. Today, the PCA acknowledges that the incorporation of varieties of knowledge in managing the PCA land/waters that can increase the effectiveness of academic research findings. This includes, but is not limited to, all types of information generated either by monitoring and conducting academic experimentation, reviewing the literature, exploring stories narrated by Indigenous elders, seeking the opinion(s) of the public and PCA collaborators because they are truly helpful for managing Canadian national parks. There is an intersection of Indigenous knowledge (IK) and Western science. Western refers to “involution to evolution”, where involution refers to the manifestation of existence. Indigenous knowledge points out the creator has created life. When nature cycles back from manifest to un-manifest state or new manifestation the reductionist points out these changes without knowing the definitive cause, evolution. Within the current system of knowledge seeking and its mobilization, we have a limited capacity to better understand the challenges and to identify knowledge need to tackle these challenges. We, both doers and knowers, must build a framework that will guide us to better understand the doers’ challenge, identify the priority of knowledge and sources, utilize knowledge in real-time and on an appropriate scale, and to measure the knowledge efficiency.

ABSTRACT

Quand le savoir est-il un pouvoir et quand ne l’est-il pas ? Depuis 1960, les terres et les eaux de l’Agence Parcs Canada (APC) constituent un excellent lieu d’expérimentation en milieu naturel pour les chercheurs (alias “les connaisseurs”). Malgré les progrès considérables de la science occidentale, les gestionnaires des ressources naturelles (aussi appelés “les faiseurs”) sont confrontés à des défis dans la gestion d’espèces diverses et rares, et de leur habitat, face au changement climatique et aux besoins de la société. La recherche universitaire est souvent axée sur la dynamique d’une seule espèce et s’est concentrée sur le réductionnisme ; la gestion durable des espèces repose sur une connaissance holistique basée sur les interactions entre les espèces et les facteurs physiques, biotiques et sociétaux. Par conséquent, soit les connaissances générées perdent le pouvoir de traiter la cause systémique des problèmes de gestion de l’environnement, soit elles ne sont plus les plus applicables. Les évolutionnistes prédisent que les animaux peuvent réagir au changement climatique de trois façons : se déplacer, s’adapter ou mourir. Par exemple, l’herptofaune (reptiles) est très sensible aux petits changements de température et plus sensible aux indicateurs mineurs du changement climatique. Les responsables tentent de donner plus de place aux espèces pour s’adapter ou de s’adapter au changement en fonction de la faisabilité. Mais en réalité, la question reste sans réponse car nous avons beaucoup de mal à comprendre quel changement n’est pas réel et ce qui, au départ, semble être un autre changement mais qui est réel. En effet, les études de conservation partent de l’organisme comme unité de base alors que dans le monde médical, elles partent de l’ADN. Pouvons-nous utiliser l’opportunité de l’application de l’ADN environnemental ? Les gestionnaires ont besoin de connaissances précises, prévisibles et plus exactes qui aident à une gestion proactive. Par exemple, les prévisions des fluctuations du niveau d’eau des Grands Lacs sont essentielles pour la durabilité de la gestion des écosystèmes côtiers, le maintien des actifs, la disponibilité des habitats pour les espèces rares des zones humides, etc. Par conséquent, nous devons aller au-delà pour relever nos défis complexes et leurs interrelations. Aujourd’hui, l’APC reconnaît que l’intégration de diverses connaissances dans la gestion des terres/eaux de l’APC peut accroître l’efficacité des résultats de la recherche universitaire. Cela inclut, sans s’y limiter, tous les types d’informations générées soit par la surveillance et la conduite d’expérimentations universitaires, la revue de la littérature, l’exploration des histoires racontées par les anciens autochtones, la recherche de l’opinion (ou des opinions) du public et des collaborateurs de l’APC car elles sont vraiment utiles pour la gestion des parcs nationaux canadiens. Il existe un croisement entre le savoir indigène (IK) et la science occidentale. La science occidentale fait référence à “l’involution vers l’évolution”, où l’involution se réfère à la manifestation de l’existence. Le savoir indigène souligne que le créateur a créé la vie. Lorsque la nature passe d’un état manifeste à un état non manifeste ou à une nouvelle manifestation, le réductionniste souligne ces changements sans en connaître la cause définitive, l’évolution. Dans le système actuel de recherche de connaissances et de mobilisation de celles-ci, nous avons une capacité limitée à mieux comprendre les défis et à identifier les connaissances nécessaires pour relever ces défis. Nous, tant ceux qui font que ceux qui savent, devons construire un cadre qui nous guidera pour mieux comprendre le défi des faiseurs, identifier la priorité des connaissances et des sources, utiliser les connaissances en temps réel et à une échelle appropriée, et mesurer l’efficacité des connaissances.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite).

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Tracking Progress: The Canadian Protected and Conserved Areas Database (CPACD)

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Richard Post with Environment and Climate Change Canada. Click on the image below to view.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Richard Post avec Environnement et changement climatique Canada. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour la visualiser.


Click to view.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Tracking the progress of marine and terrestrial conservation in Canada requires current and reliable conservation data. The Canadian Protected and Conserved Areas Database (CPCAD) is the pan-Canadian initiative that attempts to address this need. CPCAD contains the most up to date spatial and attribute data on marine and terrestrial protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures (OECM) in Canada. It is compiled and managed by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), in collaboration with federal, provincial, and territorial jurisdictions.

ABSTRACT

Pour suivre les progrès de la conservation marine et terrestre au Canada, il faut disposer de données actuelles et fiables sur la conservation. La base de données canadienne sur les aires protégées et conservées (CPCAD) est l’initiative pancanadienne qui tente de répondre à ce besoin. La CPCAD contient les données spatiales et d’attributs les plus récentes sur les aires protégées marines et terrestres et les autres mesures efficaces de conservation par zone (OECM) au Canada. Il est compilé et géré par Environnement et changement climatique Canada (ECCC), en collaboration avec les juridictions fédérales, provinciales et territoriales.

Go back to eMedia presentations.

Retournez aux présentations eMedia.

Connecting Park Leadership Research and Practice With Self-Directed Learning Online

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Sylvie Plante of Royal Roads University with Don Carruthers Den Hoed of CPCIL. Click on the image below to view.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Sylvie Plante avec Université de Royal Roads et Don Carruthers Den Hoed avec CPCIL. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour la visualiser.


Click on image to open .pdf in new window

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

How can the community of parks and protected areas effectively connect academic and applied research with day-to-day practice? How can learning that disseminates new research support the evolution of leadership practice? Taking on both roles of creator and participant, in the self-directed online learning of the proposed CPCIL park primers, I offer a unique perspective to share insights about the process and experience of integrating research and practice to create online learning that disseminates the latest research. As the lead researcher behind one of the CPCIL park primers, and also a professional learning designer and facilitator, I can share ideas on things to keep in mind when we create experiential learning for parks leaders and practitioners. I can also solicit input from participants on what they look for in self-directed online learning, to circle back into the process of co-creation and continuous improvement that connects knowers and learners. The session draws on interdisciplinary knowledge I gathered through my journey in the Doctor of Social Sciences program at Royal Roads University, culminating in the creation of a dissertation portfolio that included the learning module that informed the pilot park primer. The Collaborative Leadership for innovation park primer and accompanying video Partnering for Innovation: Social Capital for Greater Value were developed in collaboration with CPCIL using an action research approach.

ABSTRACT

Comment la communauté des parcs et des zones protégées peut-elle relier efficacement la recherche universitaire et appliquée à la pratique quotidienne ? Comment l’apprentissage qui diffuse les nouvelles recherches peut-il soutenir l’évolution des pratiques de leadership ? Assumant à la fois les rôles de créateur et de participant, dans l’apprentissage en ligne autodirigé des abécédaires des parcs proposés par CPCIL, j’offre une perspective unique pour partager des idées sur le processus et l’expérience d’intégration de la recherche et de la pratique afin de créer un apprentissage en ligne qui diffuse les dernières recherches. En tant que chercheur principal de l’un des abécédaires du parc CPCIL, et également concepteur et animateur professionnel de l’apprentissage, je peux partager des idées sur les choses à garder à l’esprit lorsque nous créons un apprentissage expérientiel pour les responsables et les praticiens des parcs. Je peux également solliciter les commentaires des participants sur ce qu’ils recherchent dans l’apprentissage autodirigé en ligne, pour revenir au processus de co-création et d’amélioration continue qui relie les connaisseurs et les apprenants. La session s’appuie sur les connaissances interdisciplinaires que j’ai acquises au cours de mon parcours dans le cadre du programme de doctorat en sciences sociales de l’Université Royal Roads, et qui ont abouti à la création d’un dossier de thèse comprenant le module d’apprentissage qui a servi de base à l’introduction au parc pilote. L’abécédaire du parc collaboratif pour l’innovation et la vidéo d’accompagnement Partnering for Innovation : Social Capital for Greater Value ont été élaborés en collaboration avec CPCIL en utilisant une approche de recherche-action.

Go back to eMedia presentations.

Retournez aux présentations eMedia.