Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target.

Canada and Aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader targets

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P.

First Published Mar, 2021

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

A renewed global agenda to address biodiversity loss was sanctioned by adoption of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets in 2010 by Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. However, Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 contained a significant policy and reporting challenge, conceding that both protected areas (PAs) and ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ (OEABCMs) could be used to meet national targets of protecting 17 and 10 % of terrestrial and marine areas, respectively. We report on a consensus-based approach used to (1) operationalize OEABCMs in the Canadian context and (2) develop a decision-screening tool to assess sites for inclusion in Canada’s Aichi Target 11 commitment. Participants in workshops determined that for OEABCMs to be effective, they must share a core set of traits with PAs, consistent with the intent of Target 11. (1) Criteria for inclusion of OEABCMs in the Target 11 commitment should be consistent with the overall intent of PAs, with the exception that they may be governed by regimes not previously recognized by reporting agencies. (2) These areas should have an expressed objective to conserve nature, be long-term, generate effective nature conservation outcomes, and have governance regimes that ensure effective management. A decision-screening tool was developed that can reduce the risk that areas with limited conservation value are included in national accounting. The findings are relevant to jurisdictions where the debate on what can count is distracting Parties to the Convention from reaching conservation goals.

Citation Details

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P. (2015). Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target. Biodiversity and Conservation, 24(14), 3559-3581. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

d10030254

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Towards mobilizing knowledge for effective decision-making in parks and protected areas.

Towards mobilizing knowledge for effective decision-making in parks and protected areas.

Hvenegaard, G. T., Halpenny, E. A., & Bueddefeld, J. N. H. 

First Published Mar, 2021

doi.org/10.3390/land10030254

In November 2017, over 15,000 scientists issued a second letter to humanity that outlines how we are “jeopardizing our future” by failing to protect key ecological systems. Catastrophic climate change, our planet’s sixth major species extinction crisis, diminishing fresh water resources, deforestation, and a host of other “alarming trends” were highlighted [1] Parks and protected areas are one of the most effective means for protecting ecological health [2]. However, parks have many other important roles. Parks and protected areas provide essential services and resources for a wide variety of purposes and groups, including nature conservation, visitor recreation, local economic opportunities, Indigenous cultures, human wellbeing, and the provision of ecosystems services such as flood mitigation and access to drinking water [3]. […]

Key words: protected areas, conserved areas, human health, well-being, promotion, policy, equity, inclusion, nature

Citation Details

Hvenegaard, G. T., Halpenny, E. A., & Bueddefeld, J. N. H. (2021). Towards mobilizing knowledge for effective decision-making in parks and protected areas. Land (Basel), 10(3), 254.https://doi.org/10.3390/land10030254

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The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda

The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda

Christopher J. Lemieux, Mark W. Groulx, Rachel T. Buxton, Catherine E. Reining, Clara-Jane (C.J.) Blye, Nadha Hassen, Sara-Lynn (Penina) Harding, Elizabeth A. Halpenny, Melissa Lem, Sonya L. Jakubec, Pamela Wright, Tonya Makletzoff, Mara Kerry, Karen Keenleyside, Pascale Salah van der Leest, Jill Bueddefeld, Raynald (Harvey) Lemelin, Don Carruthers Den Hoed, Brad Steinberg, Rike Moon, Jacqueline Scott, Jennifer Grant, Zahrah Khan, Dawn Carr, Lisa McLaughlin and Richard Krehbiel

First Published May, 2022

DOI: 10.2305/IUCN.CH.2022.PARKS‐28‐1CJL.en

In this article, we outline progress and challenges in establishing effective health promotion tied to visitor experiences provided by protected and conserved areas in Canada. Despite an expanding global evidence base, case studies focused on aspects of health and well-being within Canada’s protected and conserved areas remain limited. Data pertaining to motivations, barriers and experiences of visitors are often not collected by governing agencies and, if collected, are not made generally available or reported on. There is an obvious, large gap in research and action focused on the needs and rights of groups facing systemic barriers related to a variety of issues including, but not limited to, access, nature experiences, and needs with respect to health and well-being outcomes. Activation of programmes at the site level continue to grow, and Park Prescription programmes, as well as changes to the Accessible Canada Act, represent significant, positive examples of recent cross-sector policy integration. Evaluations of outcomes associated with HPHP programmes have not yet occurred but will be important to adapting interventions and informing cross-sector capacity building. We conclude by providing an overview of gaps in evidence and practice that, if addressed, can lead to more effective human health promotion vis-à-vis nature contact in protected and conserved areas in Canada.


Key words: protected areas, conserved areas, human health, well-being, promotion, policy, equity, inclusion, nature

Citation Details

Lemieux, C. et al. (2022). The ‘healthy parks–healthy people’ movement in Canada: progress, challenges, and an emerging knowledge and action agenda. International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation. 21 (1) doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/csp2.12654

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Assessing Evidence for Conservation Strategies

A practical approach to assessing existing evidence for specific conservation strategies

Nick Salafsky, Robin Irvine, Judy Boshoven, Jaclyn Lucas, Kent Prior, Jean-François Bisaillon, Becky Graham, Paul Haper, André Laurin, Amanda Lavers, Lalenia Neufeld, and Richard Margoluis

First Published April, 2022

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/csp2.12654

There is currently a great deal of work being undertaken to collect, analyze, and synthesize available evidence about the effectiveness of conservation strategies. But substantial challenges still remain in enabling practitioners to assess and apply this evidence to their conservation work in an efficient manner. To solve these challenges, there is growing recognition of the need to use situation assessments and theory of change pathways to detail a set of analytical questions and specific assumptions that can be assessed against the evidence base to “make the case” for a proposed strategy and to identify gaps in knowledge. In this study, we first provide updated definitions of some key terms. We then present and provide examples of an approach to enable practitioners to evaluate the evidence base for the critical assumptions that underlie their specific conservation strategies and to wisely use evidence coming from different knowledge systems. This practical approach, which was developed through a series of pilot tests with Parks Canada projects, involves four iterative steps: (1) identify critical questions and assumptions requiring evidence; (2) assemble and assess the specific and generic evidence for each assumption; (3) determine confidence in evidence and its implications; and (4) validate the assessment and iteratively adapt as needed. Ideally, this approach can be integrated into existing decision‐making frameworks and can also facilitate better cooperation between researchers who synthesize evidence and practitioners who use evidence to make conservation both more effective and efficient.

Citation Details

Salafsky, N., Irvine, R., Boshoven, J., Lucas, J., Prior, K., Jean‐François Bisaillon, . . . Margoluis, R. (2022). A practical approach to assessing existing evidence for specific conservation strategies. Conservation Science and Practice, 4(4) doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/csp2.12654

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Interplay and Cooperation in Conservation – Beyond Pacific Rim

Interplay and Cooperation in Environmental Conservation: Building Capacity and Responsive Institutions Within and Beyond the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Canada

Alejandra Orozco-Quintero, Leslie King, Rosaline Canessa

First Published June 10, 2020

https://doi.org/10.1177/2158244020932683

Corresponding Author:
Alejandra Orozco-Quintero, University of Victoria
3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada.
Email: aleja@uvic.ca

Although protected areas (PAs) have become pivotal components in the pursuit of environmental sustainability, they have had mixed success in achieving environmental goals, in part due to internal factors such as governance design and insufficient ability to operate within, and connect to, wider social, economic, and institutional frameworks. A growing body of scholarship reveals that there are fundamental mismatches between rhetoric and practice in state-driven “participatory” conservation, and that state–community cooperation is extremely challenging. This study draws on data from qualitative research on institutions and interactions in conservation planning and management to examine factors influencing collaboration between Parks Canada and Nuu-chah-nulth communities adjacent to the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. We consider the evolution of policies, institutional arrangements, state-community interactions, and socio-cultural and legal frameworks within which state-led conservation takes place to assess progress in multilevel cooperation. We found that despite differences in degrees of authority and decision-making power, and a land tenure framework that favors the state, there is a shift from domination toward negotiation in the interplay between the federal government and grassroots actors. That shift is linked to the recognition of First Nations’ ancestral tenure and custodianship, and the particularities of grassroots and state leadership. The findings suggest significant progress in sustaining the PA as a multilevel effort, and that cooperation in conservation helps all parties to build capacity for environmental stewardship beyond the PA and to fashion conservation institutions that are responsive to changing social–ecological conditions.

Citation Details

Orozco-Quintero, A., King, L., & Canessa, R. (2020). Interplay and Cooperation in Environmental Conservation: Building Capacity and Responsive Institutions Within and Beyond the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Canada. SAGE Open. https://doi.org/10.1177/2158244020932683

 

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Modélisation multi-agent de la navigation de plaisance visant à réduire les impacts envers les bélugas du St. Laurent​

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Camille Kowalski de l’Université de du Québec en Outaouais, département des sciences naturelles. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour l’agrandir.

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Camille Kowalski of the University of Quebec in Outaouais, Department of Natural Sciences. Click on the image below to enlarge.


CPCIL Research Summit ePoster by Camille Kowalski.

ABSTRACT

(English below)

Mon projet consiste à modéliser la navigation de plaisance du Saguenay St. Laurent (SSL) afin de compléter un outil d’aide à la gestion de ce système socio-écologique (3MTSim : un simulateur représentant les mouvements des bélugas et des quatre espèces de grands rorquals les plus fréquents dans la région ainsi que les différents segments de la navigation). En ajoutant le modèle multi-agent représentant les comportements des plaisanciers à 3MTSim, le simulateur fournira une vision complète du système et les impacts liés aux différents segments de la navigation (notamment acoustiques) pourront àutre évalués. Enfin, des scénarios visant à atténuer ces impacts, telle que la mise en place d’aires marines protégées, pourront àutre testés. En effet, ce milieu abrite la population résidente des belugas du St. Laurent, classée en voie de disparition. De plus, les activités de plaisance dans l’habitat du béluga sont peu documentées en comparaison des autres segments de la navigation.

Une étude publiée en 2014 met en lumière une corrélation positive entre le niveau d’activités de plaisance et la mortalité chez les veaux (le pic des activités de plaisance dans l’habitat essentiel du béluga du Saint-Laurent étant pendant la saison estivale (juillet-aout), période à laquelle les femelles belugas mettent bas et prennent soin des nouveau-nés). Ces constats ainsi que de nombreuses observations effectuées sur le terrain mettent en lumière le besoin d’approfondir les connaissances quant aux impacts de la navigation de plaisance sur la population de bélugas dans le SSL.

La objectifs spécifiques du projet :

Objectif 1 : conceptualisation du modèle multi-agent
Objectif 2 : détermination des archétypes de plaisanciers
Objectif 3 : identification des impacts acoustiques liés aux interactions bélugas – plaisanciers dans les aires de haute résidence
Objectif 4 : paramétrisation et validation du modèle multi-agent / intégration du modèle multi-agent à 3MTSim / simulations.

Pour se faire différentes méthodes seront utilisées afin de collecter des données en plus de celles étant déjà disponibles, notamment le développement d’un jeu sérieux (permettant aux participants plaisanciers de « naviguer » virtuellement sur le SSL), des observations terrestres (menées lors des saisons estivales à l’aide d’un théodolite et de jumelles sur trépied) ainsi qu’un appel à la participation volontaire des plaisanciers du SSL (collecte de trajectoires via application mobile de géolocalisation, un site internet a été créé afin d’expliquer la marche à suivre pour les personnes désirant participer). Finalement, le projet contribuera à la mise en Å“uvre des plans d’actions visant à réduire l’exposition des bélugas au bruit sous-marin, à travers l’apport de nouvelles informations concernant la navigation de plaisance du SSL.

ABSTRACT

My project consists of modeling the recreational boating of the Saguenay St. Lawrence (SSL) in order to complete a tool to help manage this socio-ecological system (3MTSim: a simulator representing the movements of beluga whales and the four species of large whales most frequent in the region as well as the different segments of the navigation). By adding the multi-agent model representing the behaviours of recreational boaters to 3MTSim, the simulator will provide a complete vision of the system and the impacts related to the different segments of navigation (notably acoustic) can be evaluated. Finally, scenarios aimed at mitigating these impacts, such as the establishment of marine protected areas, can also be tested. Indeed, this environment is home to the resident St. Lawrence beluga whale population, which is classified as endangered. In addition, recreational activities in beluga whale habitat are poorly documented compared to other segments of the shipping industry.

A study published in 2014 highlights a positive correlation between the level of recreational activities and calf mortality (the peak of recreational activities in critical St. Lawrence beluga whale habitat being during the summer season (July-August), when female beluga whales give birth and care for newborn calves). These findings, as well as numerous observations made in the field, highlight the need to increase our knowledge of the impacts of recreational boating on the beluga whale population in the SSL.

The specific objectives of the project :

Objective 1: Conceptualization of the multi-agent model
Objective 2: Determination of boater archetypes
Objective 3: Identification of acoustic impacts related to beluga-beluga interactions with boaters in areas of high residence
Objective 4: parameterization and validation of the multi-agent model / integration of the multi-agent model to 3MTSim / simulations.

Different methods will be used to collect data in addition to those already available, including the development of a serious game (allowing boaters participants to “navigate” virtually on the SSL), land observations (conducted during the summer seasons using a theodolite and binoculars on tripods) and a call for voluntary participation of SSL boaters (collection of trajectories via mobile geolocation application, a website has been created to explain the steps to follow for those wishing to participate). Finally, the project will contribute to the implementation of action plans aimed at reducing the exposure of belugas to underwater noise, through the provision of new information concerning the boating activities of the SSL.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Towards Reconciliation: 10 Calls to Action to Natural Scientists Working In Canadian Protected Areas

The above was presented at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit.

Ce qui précède a été présenté au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021.

The following is preliminary content for a session at the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit, submitted by Carmen Wong with Parks Canada, and Elder Mary Jane Gùdia) Johnson or Kluane First Nation. Click on the image below to see the full presentation.

Ce qui suit est le contenu préliminaire d’une session du Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021, présenté par Carmen Wong avec Parcs Canada, et l’aînée Mary Jane (Gùdia) Johnson ou la Première nation Kluane. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour voir la présentation complète.

Click to see full presentation.
Click to see full presentation.

ABSTRACT

(French below)

Many protected areas in Canada were created by the expulsion of Indigenous peoples from their traditional homelands. This history drives a need for reconciliation in all aspects of the management of protected areas. Here we reimagine how research could be conducted in Canadian protected areas by drawing on our recently published paper outlining 10 Calls to Action to natural scientists to enable reconciliation in Canada. This paper was written by an unique group of co-authors representing Indigenous and western science perspectives and fuelled by our critical review of the research field activities we have observed in northern Canada. Two co-authors, an Elder from Kluane First Nation and an ecologist for Parks Canada will present together the 10 Calls to Action and their specific implications for research and management activities in protected areas. Both co-authors have/are worked/working for Parks Canada and have been involved with the permitting process for research for over a decade in Kluane National Park and Reserve which is cooperatively managed with Kluane First Nation and Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. Original paper available online here: https://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139/facets-2020-0005

ABSTRACT

De nombreuses zones protégées au Canada ont été créées par l’expulsion des peuples indigènes de leurs terres traditionnelles. Cette histoire entraîne un besoin de réconciliation dans tous les aspects de la gestion des zones protégées. Nous imaginons ici comment la recherche pourrait être menée dans les zones protégées du Canada en nous appuyant sur notre document récemment publié, qui présente 10 appels à l’action adressés à des spécialistes des sciences naturelles pour permettre la réconciliation au Canada. Ce document a été rédigé par un groupe unique de co-auteurs représentant les perspectives des autochtones et de la science occidentale et alimenté par notre examen critique des activités de recherche sur le terrain que nous avons observées dans le nord du Canada. Deux co-auteurs, un aîné de la Première nation de Kluane et un écologiste de Parcs Canada, présenteront ensemble les 10 appels à l’action et leurs implications spécifiques pour les activités de recherche et de gestion dans les zones protégées. Les deux co-auteurs ont travaillé/travaillent pour Parcs Canada et ont été impliqués dans le processus d’autorisation des recherches depuis plus de dix ans dans le parc national et la réserve de Kluane, qui est géré en coopération avec la Première nation de Kluane et les Premières nations de Champagne et de Aishihik. L’article original est disponible en ligne ici : https://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139/facets-2020-0005

Limiting landscape fragmentation and promoting connectivity – An analysis using the meff metric and BACI study design

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Clara Freeman-Cole with Concordia University. Click on the image below to view.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Clara Freeman-Cole avec l’Université Concordia. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour la visualiser.


Click image to view.

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

My thesis research aims to analyse the historic development and degree of landscape fragmentation and landscape connectivity in Canadian National Parks. It explores the extent to which the creation and management of federal parks have been effective in controlling fragmentation in comparison to historically similar landscapes in unprotected areas. Given the strong negative effects on biodiversity by increasing fragmentation, and the need for maintaining and restoring landscape connectivity for key species in Canada’s national parks, I am hoping a comprehensive study of human-induced fragmentation across the National Parks System like this one will contribute to ensuring that Canada’s rich biodiversity has enough habitat to maintain itself.

Overall, my research measures the fragmentation of Canadian National Parks at key time-steps throughout their history, including before their designation and up to the current day. A Before-After Control-Impact (BACI) study design is used to allow for the evaluation of a site by comparing the changes in the environmental conditions before and after the designation of an area as a national park and at key stages throughout their park status, and with control areas that have not been a designated protected area.

To measure fragmentation, I am using the Effective Mesh Size metric which has favourable properties such as the following: being suitable for comparing the fragmentation of regions of varying total areas and different barrier strengths; it is unaffected by the inclusion or exclusion of very small patches; and it describes the structure of a barrier network in an ecologically meaningful way.

In order to map the changes in landscape fragmentation and connectivity over time, older datasets may come in the format of hard-copy maps, therefore I am digitizing these into a vector database that I hope will be able to be used by decision-makers regarding landscape connectivity in various parks. I also hope that by participating in this summit I may also be able to get some contacts from fellow participants who might have historical park maps that can be shared for this research.

ABSTRACT

Ma recherche de thèse vise à analyser le développement historique et le degré de fragmentation et de connectivité des paysages dans les parcs nationaux canadiens. Elle explore la mesure dans laquelle la création et la gestion des parcs fédéraux ont été efficaces pour contrôler la fragmentation par rapport à des paysages historiquement similaires dans des zones non protégées. Étant donné les effets négatifs importants sur la biodiversité de la fragmentation croissante et la nécessité de maintenir et de restaurer la connectivité des paysages pour les espèces clés dans les parcs nationaux du Canada, j’espère qu’une étude exhaustive de la fragmentation anthropique dans le réseau des parcs nationaux comme celle-ci contribuera à garantir que la riche biodiversité du Canada dispose d’un habitat suffisant pour se maintenir.

Dans l’ensemble, mes recherches mesurent la fragmentation des parcs nationaux canadiens à des moments clés de leur histoire, y compris avant leur désignation et jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Un plan d’étude “avant-après contrôle-impact” (BACI) est utilisé pour permettre l’évaluation d’un site en comparant les changements des conditions environnementales avant et après la désignation d’une zone comme parc national et à des étapes clés tout au long de leur statut de parc, et avec des zones témoins qui n’ont pas été désignées comme zones protégées.

Pour mesurer la fragmentation, j’utilise la mesure de la taille effective des mailles qui présente des propriétés favorables telles que les suivantes : elle permet de comparer la fragmentation de régions dont la superficie totale et la force des barrières varient ; elle n’est pas affectée par l’inclusion ou l’exclusion de très petites parcelles ; et elle décrit la structure d’un réseau de barrières d’une manière écologiquement significative.

Afin de cartographier l’évolution de la fragmentation du paysage et de la connectivité au fil du temps, les anciens ensembles de données peuvent se présenter sous la forme de cartes sur papier, c’est pourquoi je les numérise dans une base de données vectorielle qui, je l’espère, pourra être utilisée par les décideurs concernant la connectivité du paysage dans différents parcs. J’espère également qu’en participant à ce sommet, je pourrai obtenir des contacts avec d’autres participants qui pourraient avoir des cartes historiques de parcs pouvant être partagées pour cette recherche.

Traduit avec www.DeepL.com/Translator (version gratuite).

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

Go back to eMedia presentations.

Retournez aux présentations eMedia.

Collaboration entre l’Université du Québec à Rimouski et le parc marin du Saguenay – Saint-Laurent pour un suivi des attentes des touristes en croisière : Présentation du projet

The following was an ePoster/eMedia submission to the March 9-12, 2021 Virtual Research Summit by Josée Laflamme of University of Québec. Click on the image below to view.

Voici une présentation ePoster/eMedia au Sommet de Recherche Virtuel du 9 au 12 mars 2021 par Josée Laflamme avec Université du Québec à Rimouski. Cliquez sur l’image ci-dessous pour la visualiser.


Cliquez sur l’image pour ouvrir le fichier .pdf (français)

ABSTRACT

(Lisez la version française ci-dessous.)

Collaboration between the Université du Québec à Rimouski and the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park for a follow-up of the expectations of cruise tourists: Presentation of the project.

Cetacean-watching activities at sea in the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park (SSLMP) generate considerable economic stimulation. However, they also have significant environmental consequences, particularly on the species themselves. The sustainability of these tourist activities requires the implementation of measures to minimize their environmental impact.

To this end, various initiatives have been put in place, including the establishment of the Eco-Whale Alliance (EBA) in 2011, which aims to promote responsible whale-watching practices. The AEB is an initiative of a working group composed of SLMPP tour companies, the Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals (GREMM), Sépaq and Parks Canada (AEB, 2021). The objective of the AEB is to “limit the impacts and ensure the sustainable development of whale-watching activities in the Marine Park” (AEB, 2021).

These responsible practices limiting impacts on resources can have an impact on tourists’ satisfaction with their experience in the Marine Park. This research project is part of this context and focuses on determining indicators of expectations and satisfaction related to the observation of marine mammals by visitors on cruises in the SSLMP. Its objectives and methodological protocol are based on Giroul’s (2000) study, which aimed to identify the diversity of needs among visitors related to the tourist experience of marine mammal-watching activities at sea and to evaluate whether the clientele is ecotourist and to what extent the activity can reinforce visitors’ ecotourism attitudes and behaviours.

The study is therefore an adaptation of Giroul’s (2000) work to the current context, which is reflected in a different cruise service offer than in the 1990s, in the implementation of the AEB in 2011, and in the impact of the health crisis on SLMP attendance. Data collection will therefore be different in several respects from that of Giroul.


[1] Giroul, C. 2000. Étude des attentes et de la satisfaction de la clientèle des croisières aux baleines dans le secteur du parc marin du Saguenay – Saint-Laurent. Mémoire. Maîtrise en loisir, culture et tourisme, UQTR, 338p.

macos/deepLFree.translatedWithDeepL.text

ABSTRACT

Collaboration entre l’Université du Québec à Rimouski et le parc marin du Saguenay – Saint-Laurent pour un suivi des attentes des touristes en croisière : Présentation du projet.

Les activités d’observation en mer des cétacés dans le parc marin du Saguenay – Saint-Laurent (PMSSL) engendrent une stimulation économique considérable. Toutefois, elles entrainent également des conséquences environnementales notables, particulièrement sur les espèces elles-mêmes. La pérennité de ces activités touristiques passe par la mise en place de mesures pour minimiser leur impact environnemental.

À cet effet, diverses initiatives se sont concrétisées, dont la mise en place de l’Alliance Éco-baleine (AEB) en 2011, visant des pratiques responsables d’observation des baleines. L’AEB est issue d’une initiative d’un groupe de travail composé d’entreprises d’excursions du PMSSL, du Groupe de recherche et d’éducation sur les mammifères marins (GREMM), de la Sépaq et de Parcs Canada (AEB, 2021). L’objectif de l’AEB est de « limiter les impacts et assurer le développement durable des activités d’observation de baleines dans le parc marin » (AEB, 2021).

Ces pratiques responsables limitant les impacts sur les ressources peuvent avoir un impact sur la satisfaction des touristes quant à leur expérience dans le parc marin. Ce projet de recherche s’inscrit dans ce contexte et porte sur la détermination d’indicateurs des attentes et de la satisfaction liées à l’observation de mammifères marins par les visiteurs en croisière dans le PMSSL. Il s’inspire, dans ses objectifs et son protocole méthodologique, de l’étude de Giroul[1] (2000) qui avait pour buts d’une part d’identifier chez les visiteurs, la diversité des besoins liés à l’expérience touristique d’activité d’observation en mer des mammifères marins et, d’autre part, d’évaluer si la clientèle est écotouristique et jusqu’à quel point l’activité peut renforcer les attitudes et les comportements écotouristiques des visiteurs.

L’étude se veut donc une adaptation des travaux de Giroul (2000) au contexte actuel qui se traduit notamment par une offre de services de croisières différente de celle des années 90, par la mise en place de l’AEB en 2011, et par l’impact de la crise sanitaire sur la fréquentation du PMSSL. La collecte de données sera donc différente à plusieurs égards de celle de Giroul.


[1] Giroul, C. 2000. Étude des attentes et de la satisfaction de la clientèle des croisières aux baleines dans le secteur du parc marin du Saguenay – Saint-Laurent. Mémoire. Maîtrise en loisir, culture et tourisme, UQTR, 338p.

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