Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target.

Canada and Aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader targets

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P.

First Published Mar, 2021

https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

A renewed global agenda to address biodiversity loss was sanctioned by adoption of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets in 2010 by Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. However, Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 contained a significant policy and reporting challenge, conceding that both protected areas (PAs) and ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ (OEABCMs) could be used to meet national targets of protecting 17 and 10 % of terrestrial and marine areas, respectively. We report on a consensus-based approach used to (1) operationalize OEABCMs in the Canadian context and (2) develop a decision-screening tool to assess sites for inclusion in Canada’s Aichi Target 11 commitment. Participants in workshops determined that for OEABCMs to be effective, they must share a core set of traits with PAs, consistent with the intent of Target 11. (1) Criteria for inclusion of OEABCMs in the Target 11 commitment should be consistent with the overall intent of PAs, with the exception that they may be governed by regimes not previously recognized by reporting agencies. (2) These areas should have an expressed objective to conserve nature, be long-term, generate effective nature conservation outcomes, and have governance regimes that ensure effective management. A decision-screening tool was developed that can reduce the risk that areas with limited conservation value are included in national accounting. The findings are relevant to jurisdictions where the debate on what can count is distracting Parties to the Convention from reaching conservation goals.

Citation Details

MacKinnon, D., Lemieux, C. J., Beazley, K., Woodley, S., Helie, R., Perron, J., Elliott, J., Haas, C., Langlois, J., Lazaruk, H., Beechey, T., & Gray, P. (2015). Canada and aichi biodiversity target 11: Understanding ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ in the context of the broader target. Biodiversity and Conservation, 24(14), 3559-3581. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-1018-1

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External Resource

Ontario government provides a small framework on how to make public spaces accessible such as trails, beach access routes, parking, service counters and fixed waiting areas, eating areas, play spaces and paths of travel.

Ontario public spaces accessible.
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Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas Video

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas summary video YouTube

External Resource

As part of the process of Canada’s Pathway to Target 1, Indigenous Nations across turtle island in what is now known as Canada, came together in ethical space with the Federal and Provincial governments in ceremony and conference to discuss Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas in Stoney Nakoda / treaty 7 territory (Canmore, Alberta) October 2018. This short film highlights some of those discussions and the guiding principles, and is an excerpt from a longer film to be publicly released in Lkwungen territory of the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSÁNEĆ peoples (aka Victoria, BC) on April 17th, 2019 As part of the 35 year anniversary of the Meares Island Tribal Park.

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas summary video YouTube
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Guidebook/Tool

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Pick up the Playbook. Plan your Plays. Make a difference.

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Download Infographic
Download Planning Poster
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Téléchargez résumé de deux pages
Téléchargez Affiche «Planifiez votre jeu»
Téléchargez Présentation PowerPoint

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Report

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“To assist more people access, explore and enjoy natural places in Australia – Canada, UK, Finland, Germany, Switzerland” 

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